Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This code is not compilable. I can't find why in standard. Can someone explain?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

template<typename T>
class S
{
public:
   explicit S(const std::string& s_):s(s_)
   {
   }
   std::ostream& print(std::ostream& os) const
   {
      os << s << std::endl;
      return os;
   }
private:
   std::string s;
};

template<typename T>
std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const S<T>& obj)
{
   return obj.print(os);
}

/*template<>
std::ostream& operator << <std::string> (std::ostream& os, const S<std::string>& obj)
{
   return obj.print(os);
}*/

class Test
{
public:
   explicit Test(const std::string& s_):s(s_)
   {
   }
   //operator std::string() const { return s; }
   operator S<std::string>() const { return S<std::string>(s); }
private:
   std::string s;
};

int main()
{
   Test t("Hello");
   std::cout << t << std::endl;
}

Compiler output:

source.cpp: In function 'int main()':
source.cpp:47:17: error: no match for 'operator<<' in 'std::cout << t'
source.cpp:47:17: note: candidates are:
In file included from include/c++/4.7.1/iostream:40:0,
                 from source.cpp:1:
include/c++/4.7.1/ostream:106:7: note: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type& (*)(std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type&)) [with _CharT = char; _Traits = std::char_traits<char>; std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::__ostream_type = std::basic_ostream<char>]
include/c++/4.7.1/ostream:106:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from 'Test' to 'std::basic_ostream<char>::__ostream_type& (*)(std::basic_ostream<char>::__ostream_type&) {aka std::basic_ostream<char>& (*)(std::basic_ostream<char>&)}'
....
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Thats because no conversions, except for array-to-pointer, function-to-pointer, lvalue-to-rvalue and top-level const/volatile removal (cf. c++11 or c++03, 14.8.2.1), are considered when matching a template function. Specifically, your user-defined conversion operator Test -> S<string> is not considered when deducing T for your operator<< overload, and that fails.

To make this universal overload work, you must do all the work at the receiving side:

template <class T>
typename enable_if<is_S<T>::value, ostream&>::type operator <<(ostream&, const T&);

That overload would take any T, if it weren't for the enable_if (it would be unfortunate, since we don't want it to interfere with other operator<< overloads). is_S would be a traits type that would tell you that T is in fact S<...>.

Plus, there's no way the compiler can guess (or at least it doesn't try) that you intended to convert Test to a S<string> and not S<void> or whatever (this conversion could be enabled by eg. a converting constructor in S). So you have to specify that

  • Test is (convertible to) an S too
  • the template parameter of S, when converting a Test, is string

template <class T>
struct is_S {
  static const bool value = false;
};

template <class T>
struct is_S<S<T>> {
  static const bool value = true;
  typedef T T_type;
};

template <>
struct is_S<Test> {
  static const bool value = true;
  typedef string T_type;
};

You will have to convert the T to the correct S manually in the operator<< overload (eg. S<typename is_S<T>::T_type> s = t, or, if you want to avoid unnecessary copying, const S<typename is_S<T>::T_type> &s = t).

share|improve this answer
    
But is_S<Test>::value is still false - would that actually improve anything? – aschepler Jul 3 '12 at 11:55
    
I don't see how is_S will magically convert Test into a S<std::string> to print its content. Could you expand ? – Matthieu M. Jul 3 '12 at 11:56
    
@MatthieuM.: I reworked it into version 2.0 – jpalecek Jul 3 '12 at 12:27

The first paragraph of @jpalecek's answer explains what the issue is. If you need a workaround, you could add a declaration like:

inline std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& os, const S<std::string>& s)
{ return operator<< <> (os, s); }

Since that overload is not a template, implicit conversions to S<std::string> will be considered.

But I can't see any way to do this for all types S<T>...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It works. – ForEveR Jul 3 '12 at 12:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.