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What is the best way to solve this?

A static member is one for all subclasses and i want a different static member for subclasses but with the same name so I can use vehicle.canDo; this should give me different arrays depending what class the vechicle instance really is.

I can just remove the static from canDo array but all instances of the same subclass should always have the same values in the canDo array so there is no need to have canDo array in every instances, this will be big waste of memory because i will have too many instances of this class.

class Vehicle {
    public static List<string> canDo;

    static Vehicle() {
        canDo = new List<string>(); 
        canDo.Add("go");
    }
}

class Plane : Vehicle {
    static Plane() {
        canDo.Add("fly");
    }
}

class Ship : Vehicle {
    static Ship() {
        canDo.Add("sail");
    }
}



class Main {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Vehicle plane = new Plane();
        Vehicle ship = new Ship();

        plane.canDo; // Contains (go, fly and sail) i want only (go and fly)
        ship.canDo; // Contains (go, fly and sail) i want only (go and sail)
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
off the top of my head, removing the 'static' qualifier from canDo should solve this issue – Alex Jul 3 '12 at 11:44
    
Mustafa, I don't believe it'll be possible to achieve this while keeping the attribute static. In fact, when using static in any item (method, attribute, class), this item will have only one instance (kind of, actually) for the whole application (and this is important, they will have the same lifecycle). – Andre Calil Jul 3 '12 at 11:47
    
possible duplicate of Is it possible to create variable in parent class, that would initialized once per derrived type? though the wording is very different the issue is the same – Rune FS Jul 3 '12 at 11:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need an instance of the canDo list per type. So either you can pass in the collection via the constructor or you can have a static on the subtype level.

Edit (to elaborate):

Since your sub class instance all have the same 'abilities' and you don't want to populate a list for each you would need a shared list. You are using inheritance where you probably want composition:

public abstract class Vehicle
{
    protected List<string> canDo;

    protected Vehicle(List<string> canDo)
    {
        this.canDo = canDo;
    }
}

public class Plane : Vehicle
{
    public Plane(List<string> canDo) : base(canDo)
    {
    }
}

I wouldn't go with a List<string> either but rather encapsulate it in a class that makes business sense (although I understand that this is only an example). To populate the canDo list you could go with a factory or a factory method on a subtype.

There are just so many ways to do this you will need to find something that's comfortable.

Although I did present a static as an alternative (since you were asking about it) I definitely would not use a static for this myself.

share|improve this answer
    
Wasn't the original intent to keep the data at the class-level, not the instance-level? Unless I'm misunderstanding (certainly plausible), this defeats the purpose... – weberc2 Nov 29 '12 at 17:53

What is the best way to solve this?

Do not abuse static methods for things that are not static. Simple like that.

Static has no inheritance and is NOT something that CAN have inheritance scenarios in any way.

You are fighting a battle by abusing a feature - not worth fighting. Please learn proper object orientation.

share|improve this answer
    
What's the 'right' way to implement class-level (not instance-level) data without repeating the code over and over? – weberc2 Nov 29 '12 at 17:52
    
Not to do it. Implement singleton, pretty much. Reference a Container INSTANCE where you Need it. You may repeate a method / reference, but not the instance data. – TomTom Nov 29 '12 at 18:32
    
Why not if it makes your job easier? I don't write OO code for the sake of writing OO code--I write OO code because it's supposed to help me solve problems well. If it can't help solve problems well, it's not serving its purpose, and I'll do without it to automate the process. For the record, JonSkeet proposed an excellent solution to a similar problem here: stackoverflow.com/a/13631714/483347 – weberc2 Nov 29 '12 at 19:02
    
The trick with playing smart is fhat unless yo know what you do, you get hit by your smartness into the ass a year down the road. Many beginners see tons of things easier - then starty crying for help later on. Simple like that. Latest when trying to work with the data in a dynamic fasion you end up with reflection for idiotic class design. – TomTom Nov 29 '12 at 19:27
    
Or you implement really good class design that saves you time in the future. I'm not saying I understand everything, I just reject "because it's not how things are done" as an end-of-line answer for why something shouldn't be done. – weberc2 Nov 29 '12 at 20:03

Note that you could also hide the canDo of the base class using new:

class Vehicle
{
    public static List<string> canDo = new List<string>() { "go" };   
}

class Plane : Vehicle
{
    public new static List<string> canDo = new List<string>(Vehicle.canDo);
    static Plane()
    {
        canDo.Add("fly");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You do not need static variables and constructors for that, just add base constructors(which is done by default, : base() is optional):

class Vehicle {
    public List<string> canDo;

    Vehicle() {
        canDo = new List<string>(); 
        canDo.Add("go");
    }
}

class Plane : Vehicle {
    Plane() : base() {
        canDo.Add("fly");
    }
}

class Ship : Vehicle {
    Ship() : base() {
        canDo.Add("sail");
    }
}

UPDATE: based on the comment of @Eben Roux -

public abstract class Vehicle {
    protected static List<string> _canDo;
    protected abstract List<string> getCanDo();
    public List<string> canDo{
        { get {
               var _cando = new List();
               _cando.AddRange(Vehicle._canDo);
               _cando.AddRange(this.getCanDo());
               return _cando;
              }
        }
    }
    static Vehicle() {
        _canDo = new List<string>(); 
        _canDo.Add("go");
    }
}

class Ship : Vehicle {
    protected static List<string> childCanDo;
    protected override getCanDo(){
        return Ship.childCanDo;
    }
    static Ship() {
        childCanDo.Add("sail");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The OP was concerned about the fact that each instance of, say, Ship would have its own collection of canDo and that it is in effect duplicated for each instance (hope that makes sense). Nothing wrong with it if you are not going to have many instances; else the state could just be shared by injecting the canDo collection somehow / or retrieving it. – Eben Roux Jul 3 '12 at 12:10
    
@EbenRoux - thanx for the explanation. I've missed that point. So then you can still keep the static base list, and concatenate with children classes... I've updated the answer a bit... I haven't tested the code, but hope the idea is clear.. – Tisho Jul 3 '12 at 12:26
    
... But the whole idea of inheritance is gone here... As said in other answers - statics has no place here. – Tisho Jul 3 '12 at 12:34
    
Agreed :) --- however, I reckon statics do have their place but it requires some careful consideration and design. – Eben Roux Jul 3 '12 at 12:38

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