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I am trying to include a .php file that will generate a form for me by picking out questions from a MySQL database. I've found numerous ways to call this function that I have called getQuestions() with 1 parameter (page number). I've seen drop down menus that will execute my php file using onchange, or buttons (onclick) etc. But is there a way to use my function without these? I just want it to automatically load with the rest of the page without any unnecessary interactions.

Don't know if this matters but my page is made in jQuery Mobile so it should only be visible when the correct page/div-id is active.

function getQuestions(str)
    { 
    if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
      {// code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
      xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
      }
    else
      {// code for IE6, IE5
      xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
      }
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
      {
      if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
        {
            document.getElementById("page_1").innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
        }
      }
    xmlhttp.open("GET","generate_questions.php?p="+str,true);
    xmlhttp.send();
    }

These are the functions I have tried to use to view the .php within the rest of the HTML (without success)

<script type="text/javascript">
                    $(document).ready(function() {
                    getQuestions(1);
                    });
                    </script>


window.onload = function() {
                    $("#page_1").load(getQuestions(1));
                    }

window.onload = function() {
                    getQuestions(1);
                    }
share|improve this question

You can use document ready event to load rest of the content:

$(document).ready(function() {
   // your code
 });
share|improve this answer
    
That goes in the header right? But would this mean I have no real control over where exactly in the page/div-id my .php will generate the question, or does my .php file need to generate the whole page on it's own? – Tom Jul 3 '12 at 12:37
    
@TomErikHøvring That code can go anywhere it's valid to have a <script> tag; it binds to the DOM ready event, so won't execute the code until the DOM is ready. I don't know enough about jQuery mobile to give you any more advice, though. – Anthony Grist Jul 3 '12 at 12:40
    
you can put this code anywhere on your page: header, body or in div inside body. Just surround it with <script/> block. you will control where to put contents inside ajax call function, do have it already? – Pavel Morshenyuk Jul 3 '12 at 12:41
    
Got it to work, but the .php site is the only thing that shows, keeps ignoring my other html code for that page/div-id like headline and footer etc. Seems I have to generate the whole page within .php. Still says I am on index.html#page_1 though, and the css works until I refresh. Appreciate all your help though, just have to keep hammering at it until it works :) – Tom Jul 3 '12 at 12:53
    
could you show us your ajax function? it seems that it is not ajax or you handling result in not correct way – Pavel Morshenyuk Jul 3 '12 at 12:55

you can do that on Window.onload or document.ready event.

share|improve this answer

Hello following way you can call the code without click or change

just write down the function name between script tag and create that function after call the function.

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried this, but then it will only go to the .php site and leave the original site. Unless I am doing it wrong :P – Tom Jul 3 '12 at 12:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seems I solved my problem by assigning the php code to a smaller div than originally planned. I can't assign it to the page id, but to a smaller div within the page. The odd thing is it seems I can't really generate new div's within the php code either, so that sort of limits it's usage.

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