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I have a stored procedure named ParseXML in SQL Server. I have a repository pattern using LINQ to SQL. I need to call the stored procedure from within the repository layer. Unlike GetTable method, we don’t have a GetStoredProcedure method for data context. How can we call the stored procedure in such a scenario?

Dbml Code

[global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.FunctionAttribute(Name="dbo.ParseXML")]

    public ISingleResult<ParseXMLResult> ParseXML([global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.ParameterAttribute(Name="InputXML", DbType="Xml")] System.Xml.Linq.XElement inputXML)
    {
        IExecuteResult result = this.ExecuteMethodCall(this, ((MethodInfo)(MethodInfo.GetCurrentMethod())), inputXML);
        return ((ISingleResult<ParseXMLResult>)(result.ReturnValue));
    }

Repository Layer

namespace RepositoryLayer
{
public interface ILijosBankRepository
{
    System.Data.Linq.DataContext Context { get; set; }
    List<DBML_Project.BankAccount> GetAllAccountsForUser(int userID);
    void UpdateBankAccountUsingStoredProcedure();

}

public class LijosSimpleBankRepository : ILijosBankRepository
{
    public System.Data.Linq.DataContext Context
    {
        get;
        set;
    }


    public List<DBML_Project.BankAccount> GetAllAccountsForUser(int userID)
    {
        IQueryable<DBML_Project.BankAccount> queryResultEntities = Context.GetTable<DBML_Project.BankAccount>().Where(p => p.AccountOwnerID == userID);
        return queryResultEntities.ToList();
    }


    public virtual void UpdateBankAccountUsingStoredProcedure()
    {
        //Context.GetStroedProcedures();
    }

}

}

REFERENCE:

  1. Multiple UnitOfWorks, ISession and repositories
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3 Answers 3

You can do something like this, calling the method using reflection:

var inputXML = GetXML(); 

var method = Context.GetType().GetMethod("ParseXML");

if(method == null) throw new InvalidOperationException("Defined DataContext does not have method ParseXML");

var result = method.Invoke(Context, new object[]{ inputXML });

If you are using c# 4.0, you can do:

var inputXML = GetXML(); 

dynamic dynamicContext = Context;

var result = (ISingleResult<ParseXMLResult>)dynamicContext.ParseXML(inputXML);
share|improve this answer
    
I am getting compilation error: "'System.Data.Linq.DataContext.ExecuteMethodCall(object, System.Reflection.MethodInfo, params object[])' is inaccessible due to its protection level". How to make it work? –  Lijo Jul 4 '12 at 15:02
3  
Mhhh. When you start to have so many issues with the design you have, it's time to start reviewing the design. So, if the developer will define which is the datacontext to use, does it make sense to let the developer put a datacontext not knowing if it's connected to a database with ParseXML stored procedure? Is there any scenario where the caller will use a different datacontext? –  ivowiblo Jul 4 '12 at 23:34
    
Yes. The caller may use any data context. –  Lijo Jul 5 '12 at 12:10
1  
You will need to use reflection to call that methods. It's not something good. –  ivowiblo Jul 11 '12 at 16:53
1  
@ivowiblo - I like how you've addressed the letter of the OP's question pretty well. I do believe that there is a more simpler way to accomplish the OP's objectives in a way that answers the spirit of the OP's question as well as the underlying intent. –  Josh E Jul 11 '12 at 21:54

It's a pretty huge break of SOC to have any callers of your repository be aware of whether or not a particular method call results in reading text from a file, SQL statement, sprocs or even just garden gnomes typing results out on a text terminal.

To that end, it doesn't help matters to have your Context property be public. The whole point of using a repository is so that consumers are shielded from persistence concerns!

Since you seem to have a strong need to avoid using a custom-typed Context, you'd save yourself much trouble and just issue a straight-up, old-school SQL statement that will execute your sproc.

Consider refactoring your interface and logic to look more like this:

public interface ILijosBankRepository
{
    List<DBML_Project.BankAccount> GetAllAccountsForUser(int userID);
    void UpdateBankAccount(/* params go here */);
    /* ...other query methods, etc... */

}
public class LijosBankRepository : ILijosBankRepository
{
     private readonly DataContext context { get; set;}
     public LijosBankRepository(DataContext ctx) { ... }

     public void UpdateBankAccount(string inputXml)
     {
          context.ExecuteCommand("ParseXML", inputXml);
     }

}
share|improve this answer
    
@Lijo - so does this solution work for you, or not at all, or it works but not what you want? –  Josh E Jul 12 '12 at 15:48

The C# wrapper is part of your custom DataCcontext derived class. You would call like this:

public virtual void UpdateBankAccountUsingStoredProcedure()
{
    var results = Context.ParseXML(...);
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work... Context is a type of System.Data.Linq.DataContext. ParseXML stored procedure is not part of that. I am not seeing ParseXML in the intellisense for Context object. –  Lijo Jul 3 '12 at 13:02
    
You need to change your property Context to the type of the datacontext you have created instead of just System.Data.Linq.DataContext. –  ivowiblo Jul 3 '12 at 13:28
    
@ivowiblo I cannot do that, because the Context will be decided by the caller of the repository layer. Any other thoughts? –  Lijo Jul 3 '12 at 13:31
    
And why is that? –  ivowiblo Jul 3 '12 at 13:41
    
The case is required, obviously. It is OK if your concrete repository is programmed against a specific DatContext sub-class. In fact, it must be in order for this to work. –  jonnyGold Jul 3 '12 at 13:49

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