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My company has subcontracted out some web development, and the ASP.NET site they have created has some functionality I find questionable. One piece of the site is the log in and 'Remember Me' functionality. They have an option to check 'Remember Me' when logging into the site. Once logged in, the only way to log out is to clear the local cache and remove any cookies created by the site. (they have a Log Out link, but it doesn't do anything). So basically, once you log in, your logged in for life.

I told them that this was wrong, and that an explicit 'log out' by the user should always kill the user session and remove any kind of cached log in info.

So my question is this: Is there a standard for the Log In 'Remember Me' functionality?

EDIT: So, to reiterate my question specifics. I'm not asking how you log the user out. It makes complete sense to me that when logging out you would kill the users session and any cookies.

My question is there any scenario whereas when the User clicks the Log Out button it does nothing. In other words, if a user logs in, and checks the Remember Me button, should the user be logged in forever, with no way of logging out other than clearing the users cache? This seems really bizarre to me, but a contractor we have hired seems to this is as normal as the sun rising in the morning.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well i had similar issues with OpenId and MVC so I found this snippet:

   public ActionResult LogOff()
        {
            FormsAuthentication.SignOut();
            Session.Abandon();

            HttpCookie cookie1 = new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, "");
            cookie1.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1);
            Response.Cookies.Add(cookie1);

            HttpCookie cookie2 = new HttpCookie("ASP.NET_SessionId", "");
            cookie2.Expires = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-1);
            Response.Cookies.Add(cookie2);

            return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
        }

This will clear out session and cookies even if they are marked persistant by FormsAuthentication which I think happens when Remember is checked, hope it helps!

UPDATE:

The Remember me function is just so you don't get session timeout's and get auto sign out after period of time. Sign out should really Log out the user.

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+1 But I don't think the extra code for removing the cookies is needed. If using FormsAuthentication, the SignOut method should remove the cookie information automatically. –  Icarus Jul 3 '12 at 13:14
    
@Icarus Well truth to be told, it doesn't, I had a case where I set persistent cookie when logging in user through OpenId, you can sign out and everything is fine, but then after that when I tried logging in with normal membership account I got logged in as the same OpenId user, like cookies from first login were still there, but this solved it... –  Unavailable Jul 3 '12 at 13:17
    
I agree. I have that code, or some variation of, in my web site projects. The question isn't How do you allow the user to Log off, but rather should the user be allowed to log off? –  Jeff Reddy Jul 3 '12 at 13:58
1  
@JeffReddy Personally, I think I never saw a site where you can't log off. That is a huge security flaw. You should definetly implement log off function even if there is no sensitive data involved with the account, and you can always implement another step which requires user to confirm that he really wants to sign out, like here on SO. It can't hurt to implement it, but it can prevent others from using your account to mess with the data.. –  Unavailable Jul 3 '12 at 14:09
    
I'm glad I'm not crazy then. I'm fighting with this guy at the company we've contracted with and he won't back down. His solution is to remove the Remember Me check box. –  Jeff Reddy Jul 3 '12 at 14:15

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