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The following Jsoup code concatenates the text of all elements in container els:

for (Element el : els)
  entireText += el.text();          

On a container with ~64 elements, each containing ~1KB (totaling in entireText being ~64KB), this simple loop takes about 8 seconds on a typical low-end Android phone.

This slow performance kind of surprises me because I was under the impression that Java compilers substitute expressions like A + B + C with new StringBuilder(A).append(B).append(C).toString().

Is that not the case?

What am I missing?

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Did you compare the two options or is it just a guess that string concatenation is the root cause of your problem? –  home Jul 3 '12 at 12:48
    
@home Of course I compared. The StringBuilder option does it in less than 1 second. –  Souper Jul 3 '12 at 12:54
1  
The javac compiler does almost no optimisations. Even with the JIT, it won't optimise this code much. The developer needs to know this is really in efficient. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 3 '12 at 13:08
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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This slow performance kind of surprises me because I was under the impression that Java compilers substitute expressions like A + B + C with new StringBuilder(A).append(B).append(C).toString().

And so the compiler creates the code:

for (Element el : els)
  entireText = new StringBuilder(entireText).append(el.text()).toString(); 

You will need to create the StringBuilder outside the loop and append to it manually.

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Why not appending text on each iteration to one StringBuilder instance? For what are you making new StringBuilder each iteration? –  alaster Jul 3 '12 at 12:53
    
@mlk Ah OK. I thought that the Java compiler is smarter than that. –  Souper Jul 3 '12 at 12:56
    
@alaster - You should create one StringBuilder. My code was to show what the compiler IS doing not what the OP should do. –  mlk Jul 3 '12 at 12:58
4  
@Souper: it can't really. You request and build a String variable. The compiler can't really ignore that request and not build that object. The JVM could theoretically detect that you never use the String except for building a new one and create a StringBuilder instead, but I doubt that any JVM does that kind of optimization. –  Joachim Sauer Jul 3 '12 at 12:58
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The problem here is that your first iteration creates one 1k String, the second creates a 2k String, the third creates a 3k String, ...

And each String requires creating a copy of the previous one. So your first iteration copies 1k text, the second copies 2k, the third copies 3k, ...

So each iteration is slower than the previous one and your last iteration allocates a 64k buffer and copies 64k.

Using a StringBuilder (as @mlk showed) means you pretty much just allocate 64k once (not quite, but close enough) and only copy 64k data in total (as opposed to 64k+63k+62k+61k+60k+...).

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