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I have a table with a field:

'last_modified - timestamp NOT NULL'

  • I set the default value to the current timestamp. However this only works when updating or inserting from phpMyAdmin and not from my script.

I have tried

$sql = sprintf("UPDATE %s SET timestamp=now(), %s WHERE id='%s'", $table, $implodeArray, $_POST['id']);

and it still doesnt seem to work. How can I make the timestamp update when I update or insert by table from a script?

Also heres a sample of the scripts output:

UPDATE about SET timestamp=now(), page_header = 'Page header goes here', sub_header = 'Sub header goes here', content_short = 'This is where a short description of the about page goes', content = 'This is where the full content description goes' WHERE id='1'

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do not timestamp=now() in your query if you have set its default value to current timestamp. –  manurajhada Jul 3 '12 at 12:59
    
so remove the default value and it should work? –  Alex Jul 3 '12 at 13:00
1  
@juergen thats a microsoft post. not really the same thing...? –  Alex Jul 3 '12 at 13:01
    
Yes Alex, if you plan to update the timestamp manually remove the default value. –  Dainis Abols Jul 3 '12 at 13:02
    
did that doesnt seem to work –  Alex Jul 3 '12 at 13:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

May be I mirsead,but your column name is last_modified (typed timestamp), so the query should be:

UPDATE about SET last_modified=now(), 
page_header = 'Page header goes here', 
sub_header = 'Sub header goes here', 
content_short = 'This is where a short description of the about page goes', 
content = 'This is where the full content description goes' 
WHERE id='1'
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if you use a reserved word as your table or columnname then you need to quote it

$sql = sprintf("UPDATE %s SET `timestamp`=now(), %s WHERE id='%s'", $table, $implodeArray, $_POST['id']);

in this case you used timestamp as a columnname so you needed to quote it

To update timestamps automatically you can rely on mysql itself if you only have 1 timestamp column or you can add ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP when defining your timestamp column, for more info see TIMESTAMP initialisation

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column name is last_modified... –  Alex Jul 3 '12 at 13:06
    
MySQL permits TIMESTAMP as an unquoted identifier. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/reserved-words.html. –  eggyal Jul 3 '12 at 13:06
    
yea thats what i thought as well –  Alex Jul 3 '12 at 13:07
    
And please read this: PHP: SQL Injection –  jexact Jul 3 '12 at 13:09
    
did the on update current_timestamp... but like i said it just works when i am updating from phpmyadmin and not my script –  Alex Jul 3 '12 at 13:09

If you want to update the timestamp every time something happens to the record (i.e. last modified date/time) then it is best to leave it fro the DB. You can not rely on default value in field definition because it will work only on INSERT (when the record/field is created), use SET last_modified=GETDATE() [or GETUTCDATE()] the actual functions may differ depending on your actual SQL server.

And "Ivan Buttinoni" is absolutely correct and nobody, including me, noticed it before - your field name is wrong, but the above comments still apply.

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If you have something like Framework that does not allow to "now()" this field - just make field to NOT NULL and set PHP variable (model->field) to null just before saving..

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