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I have some text (the HTML of a page) containing JavaScript variable definitions:

var FOREGROUND_COLOR = '#ffffff';    
var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '#aaaaaa';
var BORDER_COLOR = '#000000';

I want to match the string contents using a ruby regexp pattern like /var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '(#.*?)';/ and replace the capture with a replacement value, (#bbbbbb), but then return the whole original pattern with the value replaced, such that the new contents would be

var FOREGROUND_COLOR = '#ffffff';    
var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '#bbbbbb';
var BORDER_COLOR = '#000000';

A primary constraint is that the pattern is defined in an external file, and the replacement value is from the database and the contents (an HTML page with javascript and other values I want to change) are out of my control at runtime. So when the pattern is defined, I don't know the replacement, and when the replacement is defined, I don't know the pattern. Thus, I need to assume both pattern and value are given.

Simple ruby gsub doesn't work:

contents.gsub(pattern, replacement)
=> 
var FOREGROUND_COLOR = '#ffffff';    
#bbbbbb                               // this is the problem with simple gsub
var BORDER_COLOR = '#000000';

but it looks like I might be able to use the block syntax using back references (\1). But I would prefer not to have to change my patterns as they are already complex (this is a simplified case, and regexp is necessary to handle the variations in pattern). I could hack around and make it work, but that doesn't seem wise.

How can I do this efficiently in Ruby?

ADDITIONAL CLARIFICATION (why an answer isn't accepted yet) I know the pattern in advance, but it isn't always in the form var SOMETHING = '#COLOR_VALUE'; -- it might be a CSS rule, or a URL or other arbitrary patterns. If I have a value X, Y and Z and a pattern /The letters of the day are (.*?), Cookie Monster/ and contents that contain

<p>Welcome to Sesame Street!</p>
<p>The letters of the day are Q, J and L, Cookie Monster.  Do you like them?</p>

After my operation the content should be

<p>Welcome to Sesame Street!</p>
<p>The letters of the day are X, Y and Z, Cookie Monster.  Do you like them?</p>

I don't think the answers through July 11th provide a generic solution, although they may answer the problem I asked. Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
It works perfectly, you're just not giving it what the actual replacement is--you only give part of it. If you don't want to re-write, then wrap up the replacement value in a util method that provides the rest of the replacement value. –  Dave Newton Jul 3 '12 at 13:23
    
@DaveNewton -- I do believe I know what I need to do, and also suspect I am close to a solution. It's that pesky "how" part that is eluding me :-) –  Tom Harrison Jr Jul 3 '12 at 13:39
    
@tharrison: @Dave is right. Just replace the substitution string with a full statment var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '#ffffff' rather than '#ffffff'. But why are you giving JavaScript values by changing it before you serve it? That seems to be something that would go better using another method (can't tell you what that is, I'm not familiar enough with web dev to know). –  Linuxios Jul 3 '12 at 13:43
    
@Linuxios Perhaps what's not clear in my question is that the pattern is defined in an external file, the replacement is a value in the database and the content is a web page. –  Tom Harrison Jr Jul 3 '12 at 13:47
    
@tharrison: Ok. Sorry. I though you were changing your JavaScript as you were serving it. I thought that that could have a better soulution. –  Linuxios Jul 3 '12 at 13:48

2 Answers 2

Here's a solution that allows you to store multiple replacement values for each regex:

JS = %Q{
  var FOREGROUND_COLOR = '#ffffff';    
  var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '#aaaaaa';
  var BORDER_COLOR = '#000000';
}

# String regexes from DB mapped to array of replacement values
# First array entry [0] matched the first regex capture \1
FIND_REPLACE = {
  "var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '(#.*?)';" => ['#bbbbbb']
}

def replace_all( str, find_replace )
  str.dup.tap do |result|
    find_replace.each do |re,replacements|
      result.gsub! Regexp.new(re) do
        matches = $~
        matches[0].tap do |result|
          replacements.each.with_index do |replacement,i|
            found = matches[i+1]
            puts "Replacing #{found} with #{replacement}"
            result[found] = replacement
          end
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

puts replace_all( JS, FIND_REPLACE )

#=> Replacing #aaaaaa with #bbbbbb
#=> 
#=>   var FOREGROUND_COLOR = '#ffffff';    
#=>   var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '#bbbbbb';
#=>   var BORDER_COLOR = '#000000';

This is not an ideal answer, as the line result[found] = replacement may do the wrong thing if the result of a previous replacement on this pass created content that is the same as text matched later on. For example:

# Should output "dogs = emus"
puts replace_all "cats = dogs", "(\\w+) = (\\w+)" => ["dogs","emus"]
#=> Replacing cats with dogs
#=> Replacing dogs with emus
#=> emus = dogs

# Should output "foo = bar"
puts replace_all "foo = foo", "foo = (\\w+)" => ["bar"]
#=> Replacing foo with bar
#=> bar = foo
share|improve this answer

Script:

contents = 'var FOREGROUND_COLOR = \'#ffffff\';     
var BACKGROUND_COLOR = \'#aaaaaa\'; 
var BORDER_COLOR = \'#000000\';'

pattern = '(?<=(var BACKGROUND_COLOR = \'))(#[a-zA-Z\d]+)(?=(\';))'

replacement = '#bbbbbb'

contents = contents.sub(/#{pattern}/m, replacement)
puts contents;
puts "\n"
puts $1+$2+$3;

Output:

var FOREGROUND_COLOR = '#ffffff';     
var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '#bbbbbb'; 
var BORDER_COLOR = '#000000';

var BACKGROUND_COLOR = '#aaaaaa';

Test the code here.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I don't have the flexibility to do as you suggest. I will clarify my question. Thanks. –  Tom Harrison Jr Jul 3 '12 at 13:49
    
@tharrison - new update - still not what you need? –  Ωmega Jul 3 '12 at 16:00
    
This might be the way to go -- multiple captures in the pattern which I can re-assemble with string concatenation. –  Tom Harrison Jr Jul 3 '12 at 17:57

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