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Dealing with some legacy code and in trying to get a poorly designed database to display what we want I did a self-union on a table to display an intersection of records in a certain order - simplified e.g.

SET @setOfRecords = 1234
SET @subsetOfRecords = 4567 

--Set A
SELECT * 
FROM results
WHERE 
    resultSet = @setOfRecords AND
    resultSubset = 4567

UNION

--Set B
SELECT * 
FROM results
WHERE 
    resultSet = @setOfRecords AND
    resultSubset <> 4567

Displays correctly, i.e.

Set A
Set B

However, if I parametrise the subset id this order is reversed - e.g.

SET @setOfRecords = 1234
SET @subsetOfRecords = 4567 

--Set A
SELECT * 
FROM results
WHERE 
    resultSet = @setOfRecords AND
    resultSubset = @subsetOfRecords

UNION

--Set B
SELECT * 
FROM results
WHERE 
    resultSet = @setOfRecords AND
    resultSubset <> @subsetOfRecords

Displays incorrectly, i.e.

Set B
Set A

I am aware that this is not an ideal method, however other constraints have lead to the necessity of this implementation. My question is purely on why the ordering is affected by parametrisation on the resultSubset ID.

Any ideas? Running on SQL Server 2008.

Thanks, Paul

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why do you expect any specific order? You haven't included an ORDER BY clause. Therefore SQL Server is free to return the rows in any order it deems most efficient.

If you want a predictable order, include an ORDER BY clause. If you don't include one, you're telling SQL Server that you don't care about order.

In this case you can compare the actual execution plans and you will probably find a difference in at least one sort operator. This could be due to a variety of reasons, including parameter sniffing, statistics, etc...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, I'll have a look at the execution plan. –  Paul Coghill Jul 3 '12 at 13:51
1  
@PaulCoghill - you will need to add an ORDER BY to get it to behave consistently (even if you can fudge the execution plan now, any change (service pack, data volumes, phase of the moon) might change the plan again. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 3 '12 at 13:55
1  
@PaulCoghill also the sort may be introduced in different ways because you're using UNION (which filters out duplicates in both sets). If you don't need to weed out duplicates, you will probably see different behavior with UNION ALL instead. But if you want to rely on a consistent ordering, as several people have said now, you need an ORDER BY clause. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 3 '12 at 13:55

The order of results are not guaranteed unless you add an ORDER BY clause. Can you add a column to indicate the set and order on it?

Update per your comment, are you saying you couldn't do something like this?

SET @setOfRecords = 1234
SET @subsetOfRecords = 4567 

--Set A
SELECT * 
FROM (
    select 'A' as TheSet, results.*
    from results) A
WHERE 
    resultSet = @setOfRecords AND
    resultSubset = @subsetOfRecords

UNION

--Set B
SELECT * 
FROM (
    select 'B' as TheSet, results.*
    from results) B
WHERE 
    resultSet = @setOfRecords AND
    resultSubset <> @subsetOfRecords

ORDER BY TheSet
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid not in this case, adding a column would have been ideal but given the circumstances we just needed the data out - was just surprised that the parametrisation caused this change. –  Paul Coghill Jul 3 '12 at 13:48
    
@PaulCoghill, please see my update. –  adam0101 Jul 3 '12 at 13:53
    
Ah yes, you are right, that would indeed have worked. Thanks for that, don't know why I didn't think of that - not enough caffeine today! I was mostly interested as to why this made a difference at all. I didn't think the parametrisation would have mattered. –  Paul Coghill Jul 3 '12 at 13:58
    
You can even do it the other way - add the column as part of the SELECT clauses that define the union, then wrap it all into a subselect that doesn't select the TheSet column in the final SELECT clause, but does use it in the outer ORDER BY - so the column list of the result doesn't change. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 3 '12 at 13:59

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