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I know that non-type template argument for intgral type must be const expression so:

template <int E>
class cat
{
public:
    int array[E];
};

int main()
{
    cat<4> ob; // ??
}

From what I've read only const variables that get initialized with const expressions are const expressions. In this example, we have int E = 4;, so E will not be a constexpression.

So why doesn't cat<4> ob; throw an error? Am I missing something here?
And how will int array[E]; be created if E is not known at compile time?

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7  
4 is a compile time constant. –  hmjd Jul 3 '12 at 13:48
    
@hmjd Im talking about E. when I did cat<4> ob; it like telling the compiler to create the variable E and set it to 4, and since E is non-const int. so the value of E will not be known at compile time. so array[E] will throw an error. –  AlexDan Jul 3 '12 at 13:53
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

E is 4 before actual compilation starts. Template specialization takes place before that, which means that the code actually seen by the compiler is something like

 class cat4
 {
 public:
 int array[4];
 };

 int main()
 {
 cat4 ob;
 }

This is a fairly loose interpretation, don't take it ad-litteram.

To really test this scenario out, you can try:

 template <int E>
 class cat
 {
 public:
 int array[E];
 };

 int main()
 {
 int k = 4;
 cat<k > ob; // ??
 }
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Im talking about E. when I did cat<4> ob; it like telling the compiler to create the variable E and set it to 4, and since E is non-const int. so the value of E will not be known at compile time –  AlexDan Jul 3 '12 at 13:55
    
@AlexDan you're thinking about templates the wrong way. E is not a variable, it's a template parameter. IMO templates are closer to macros than they are to actual classes. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 3 '12 at 13:56
    
@AlexDan It's not accurate to call E a variable and in fact for all practical matters it doesn't vary. –  Luc Danton Jul 3 '12 at 13:57
    
@LuchianGrigore : so E will be replaced by the value 4. if it's true, than this explain everything to me. –  AlexDan Jul 3 '12 at 13:59
    
@AlexDan yes, and by whatever other values you specialize the template on. You can also have cat<5> and cat<1> and they all generate different classes with different sizes for the inner array. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 3 '12 at 14:00
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Whatever you read was rather incomplete.

Constant expressions also include literals (like 4), enumerators, sizeof expressions, the results of constexpr functions with constant arguments (since 2011), as well as const variables. Any of these with integer type can be used as an integer template argument.

There are probably a few others that I haven't thought of, and any complex expression built from constant expressions is also a constant expression.

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