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I've tried googling for the answer to my question, and i'm sure the answer is out there, I just don't know what to search. Basically what i'm trying to do is take a line from a file grab the last 2 fields (seperated by "\") and then print those two fields.

However, I want these fields to be printed out with 2 backslashes in beween them. (i'm working with windows path's) Here's my statement

$ line = C:\Windows\System32\folder1\folder2\folder3\executable.exe

$ echo $line | awk -F "\\" '{print $(NF-2)$(NF-0)}'

I want the output to return folder3\\executable.exe

My experience with awk is limited. Thank you in advanced for any help

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From the command line:

$ echo $line | awk 'BEGIN{FS="\\"; OFS="\\\\"} {print $(NF-1), $NF}'

will give you

folder3\\executable.exe

for your line

FS sets the field separator for the line(s) processed, OFS the output field separators. The double \\ are necessary to escape the special meaning of the single \.

Note that your assignment to line should enclose the string in "" with no spaces before/after the =. I.e.,

line="C:\Windows\System32\folder1\folder2\folder3\executable.exe"

Alternatively, this script (so.awk)

BEGIN { FS="\\"
        OFS="\\\\"}
{print $(NF-1), $NF}

will give you the same output if invoked as echo $line | awk -f so.awk data.txt where data.txt contains your one (or possibly more) path(s)

Update:

In case you should want to print leading double backslashes: print "", $(NF-1), $NF will do the trick by adding an empty string at the start, as mentioned in a helpful comment by @Dennis Williamson

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Awesome!! thanks so much. I asked that last question before you added your full answer. This is great. Thank you –  Jaron Bradley Jul 3 '12 at 14:09
    
@JaronBradley Happy to help. –  Levon Jul 3 '12 at 14:09
    
@JaronBradley: To print the leading double backslash: print "", $NF, $(NF-1) –  Dennis Williamson Jul 3 '12 at 14:15
    
@Levon: Why did you remove the leading double backslash in the question? –  Dennis Williamson Jul 3 '12 at 14:19
    
@DennisWilliamson Good/useful point (and easily done) if needed - thanks (though OP only mentioned printing the last 2 fields with `\\` between them -- but just in case :) –  Levon Jul 3 '12 at 14:19

The variable you want to set is OFS, for Output Field Separator.

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You can also use rev for reverse the string, split your string on the '\' separator and then take the first two string in the array. In the end, compose the string with the previous separator '\' and reverse again.

The reverse is necessary because you can't always know the numbers of sub-directory between the root and the last one.

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tac reverses the order of lines (top to bottom). You mean rev which reverses left to right. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 3 '12 at 14:18
    
You are right, thanks for the correction. I edit it immediately –  Gianni B. Jul 4 '12 at 9:10

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