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How do I catch a Ctrl+C in multiprocess python program and exit all processes gracefully, I need the solution to work both on unix and windows. I've tried the following:

import multiprocessing
import time
import signal
import sys

jobs = []

def worker():
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal_handler)
    while(True):
        time.sleep(1.1234)
        print "Working..."

def signal_handler(signal, frame):
    print 'You pressed Ctrl+C!'
    # for p in jobs:
    #     p.terminate()
    sys.exit(0)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    for i in range(50):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker)
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()

And it's kind of working, but I don't think it's the right solution.

EDIT: This might be a duplicate of this one

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2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The solution is based on this link and this link and it solved the problem, I had to moved to Pool though:

import multiprocessing
import time
import signal
import sys

def init_worker():
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal.SIG_IGN)

def worker():
    while(True):
        time.sleep(1.1234)
        print "Working..."

if __name__ == "__main__":
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(50, init_worker)
    try:
        for i in range(50):
            pool.apply_async(worker)

        time.sleep(10)
        pool.close()
        pool.join()

    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print "Caught KeyboardInterrupt, terminating workers"
        pool.terminate()
        pool.join()
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That's a bit too late: there is a race condition window between fork() return in the child process and signal() call. The signal must be blocked before forking. –  Maxim Egorushkin Jul 3 '12 at 15:55
    
@MaximYegorushkin - the signal is blocked in init_worker which is called before the apply_async - is that what you're talking about? –  zenpoy Jul 3 '12 at 16:06
    
What I mean is that the signal must be blocked before the child process is forked and unblocked after. This way the child inherits the signal mask and has no chance to receive the signal. –  Maxim Egorushkin Jul 3 '12 at 16:19
    
It's not too late at all. Also, init_worker is not called before apply_asyc. What happens, init_worker function (as object) is passed to the Pool object. Then pool.apply_async is called and internally calls the init_worker function right before the child is forked. Not sure though how Pool deals with unblocking the signal. –  Chris Koston Jan 21 at 20:14

Just handle KeyboardInterrupt-SystemExit exceptions in your worker process:

def worker():
    while(True):
        try:
            msg = self.msg_queue.get()
        except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
            print "Exiting..."
            break
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