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How do I catch a Ctrl+C in multiprocess python program and exit all processes gracefully, I need the solution to work both on unix and windows. I've tried the following:

import multiprocessing
import time
import signal
import sys

jobs = []

def worker():
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal_handler)
    while(True):
        time.sleep(1.1234)
        print "Working..."

def signal_handler(signal, frame):
    print 'You pressed Ctrl+C!'
    # for p in jobs:
    #     p.terminate()
    sys.exit(0)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    for i in range(50):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker)
        jobs.append(p)
        p.start()

And it's kind of working, but I don't think it's the right solution.

EDIT: This might be a duplicate of this one

share|improve this question
up vote 21 down vote accepted

The solution is based on this link and this link and it solved the problem, I had to moved to Pool though:

import multiprocessing
import time
import signal
import sys

def init_worker():
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal.SIG_IGN)

def worker():
    while(True):
        time.sleep(1.1234)
        print "Working..."

if __name__ == "__main__":
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(50, init_worker)
    try:
        for i in range(50):
            pool.apply_async(worker)

        time.sleep(10)
        pool.close()
        pool.join()

    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print "Caught KeyboardInterrupt, terminating workers"
        pool.terminate()
        pool.join()
share|improve this answer
    
That's a bit too late: there is a race condition window between fork() return in the child process and signal() call. The signal must be blocked before forking. – Maxim Egorushkin Jul 3 '12 at 15:55
    
@MaximYegorushkin - the signal is blocked in init_worker which is called before the apply_async - is that what you're talking about? – zenpoy Jul 3 '12 at 16:06
    
What I mean is that the signal must be blocked before the child process is forked and unblocked after. This way the child inherits the signal mask and has no chance to receive the signal. – Maxim Egorushkin Jul 3 '12 at 16:19
    
It's not too late at all. Also, init_worker is not called before apply_asyc. What happens, init_worker function (as object) is passed to the Pool object. Then pool.apply_async is called and internally calls the init_worker function right before the child is forked. Not sure though how Pool deals with unblocking the signal. – Chris Koston Jan 21 '15 at 20:14
2  
This only works because of the time.sleep. If you try to get() the results of the map_async call instead, the interrupt is delayed until processing is complete. – Clément Jun 3 '15 at 17:25

Just handle KeyboardInterrupt-SystemExit exceptions in your worker process:

def worker():
    while(True):
        try:
            msg = self.msg_queue.get()
        except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
            print "Exiting..."
            break
share|improve this answer

The accepted solution has race conditions and it does not work with map and async functions.

The correct way to handle Ctrl+C/SIGINT with multiprocessing.Pool is to:

  1. Make the process ignore SIGINT before a process Pool is created. This way created child processes inherit SIGINT handler.
  2. Restore the original SIGINT handler in the parent process after a Pool has been created.
  3. Use map_async and apply_async instead of blocking map and apply.
  4. Wait on the results with timeout because the default blocking waits ignore all signals. This is Python bug https://bugs.python.org/issue8296.

Putting it together:

#!/bin/env python
from __future__ import print_function

import multiprocessing
import os
import signal
import time

def run_worker(delay):
    print("In a worker process", os.getpid())
    time.sleep(delay)

def main():
    print("Initializng 2 workers")
    original_sigint_handler = signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal.SIG_IGN)
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool(2)
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, original_sigint_handler)
    try:
        print("Starting 2 jobs of 5 seconds each")
        res = pool.map_async(run_worker, [5, 5])
        print("Waiting for results")
        res.get(60) # Without the timeout this blocking call ignores all signals.
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print("Caught KeyboardInterrupt, terminating workers")
        pool.terminate()
    else:
        print("Normal termination")
        pool.close()
    pool.join()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
share|improve this answer

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