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The system I'm running on is Windows XP, with JRE 1.6.

I do this :

public static void main(String[] args) {
    try {
        System.out.println(new File("C:\\test a.xml").toURI().toURL());
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }       
}

and I get this : file:/C:/test%20a.xml

How come the given URL doesn't have two slashes before the C: ? I expected file://C:.... Is it normal behaviour?


EDIT :

From Java source code : java.net.URLStreamHandler.toExternalForm(URL)

    result.append(":");
    if (u.getAuthority() != null && u.getAuthority().length() > 0) {
        result.append("//");
        result.append(u.getAuthority());
    }

It seems that the Authority part of a file URL is null or empty, and thus the double slash is skipped. So what is the authority part of a URL and is it really absent from the file protocol?

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I really hope that you put spaces before {s... –  Zifre Jul 15 '09 at 13:05
    
Which version of Windows are you running on? Actually doesn't matter if you can parse it back with new URL(String). –  kd304 Jul 15 '09 at 13:10
    
@kd304 : well it matters if I'm parsing the result with something else than URL(String), which I do. –  subtenante Jul 15 '09 at 13:16
1  
Amusingly, the javadoc for java.net.URL still refers to the original NCSA Mosaic help pages, which unsurprisingly, is a dead link. I think I might file a bug against that.... –  skaffman Jul 15 '09 at 13:24
1  
@kd304 : not myself, but some other library. –  subtenante Jul 15 '09 at 13:38
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

That's an interesting question.

First things first: I get the same results on JRE6. I even get that when I lop off the toURL() part.

RFC2396 does not actually require two slashes. According to section 3:

The URI syntax is dependent upon the scheme. In general, absolute URI are written as follows:

<scheme>:<scheme-specific-part>

Having said that, RFC2396 has been superseded by RFC3986, which states

The generic URI syntax consists of a hierarchical sequence of omponents referred to as the scheme, authority, path, query, and fragment.

  URI         = scheme ":" hier-part [ "?" query ] [ "#" fragment ]

  hier-part   = "//" authority path-abempty
              / path-absolute
              / path-rootless
              / path-empty

The scheme and path components are required, though the path may be empty (no characters). When authority is present, the path must either be empty or begin with a slash ("/") character. When authority is not present, the path cannot begin with two slash characters ("//"). These restrictions result in five different ABNF rules for a path (Section 3.3), only one of which will match any given URI reference.

So, there you go. Since file URIs have no authority segment, they're forbidden from starting with //.

However, that RFC didn't come around until 2005, and Java references RFC2396, so I don't know why it's following this convention, as file URLs before the new RFC have always had two slashes.

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Yes but : tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1738 . Section 3.10 tells me files should have double slashes in URLs. –  subtenante Jul 15 '09 at 13:44
    
And the example at the end of section 1.1 of RFC3986 has this example : file:///etc/hosts. –  subtenante Jul 15 '09 at 13:47
    
I noticed that, too. Sometimes I think they should just make the specs easier to read. –  Powerlord Jul 15 '09 at 14:08
    
Well, thanks anyways. :) –  subtenante Jul 15 '09 at 14:23
1  
Section 3.2.2 of RFC 3986 clarifies this by noting that the authority may be empty: "If the URI scheme defines a default for host, then that default applies when the host subcomponent is undefined or when the registered name is empty (zero length). For example, the "file" URI scheme is defined so that no authority, an empty host, and "localhost" all mean the end-user's machine, whereas the "http" scheme considers a missing authority or empty host invalid." –  Ilmari Karonen Jan 8 '13 at 12:51
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To answer why you can have both:

file:/path/file
file:///path/file
file://localhost/path/file

RFC3986 (3.2.2. Host) states:

"If the URI scheme defines a default for host, then that default applies when the host subcomponent is undefined or when the registered name is empty (zero length). For example, the "file" URI scheme is defined so that no authority, an empty host, and "localhost" all mean the end-user's machine, whereas the "http" scheme considers a missing authority or empty host invalid."

So the "file" scheme translates file:///path/file to have a context of the end-user's machine even though the authority is an empty host.

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As far as using it in a browser is concerned, it doesn't matter. I have typically seen file:///... but one, two or three '/' will all work. This makes me think (without looking at the java documentation) that it would be normal behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand 3 slashes : // + /C: which is logical. The problem is that I am not using a browser. –  subtenante Jul 15 '09 at 13:39
    
3 Slashes makes sense on a UNIX-type system; the third slash is the root directory. file:///etc/passwd is the /etc/passwd file. –  Powerlord Jul 15 '09 at 13:44
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