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This is just another interview question.

Can we have a linked list of different data types, i.e. each element in a linked list can have different structure or union elements? If it's possible can you please explain with an example?

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2  
Jeez, C? Not even C++ with its wonderful templates? Get out of the 1970s! :) –  Brad Wilson Jul 15 '09 at 13:23
    
There are still systems out there that use COBOL. Which is the whole reason I went into embedded computing, which in some cases will only support plain ol' C available for a give platform, but it's beats the doing accounting software in COBOL! I rather do assembly than COBOL! –  NoMoreZealots Jul 15 '09 at 16:21
2  
MULTIPLY SUBTOTAL AND TAX GIVING TOTAL –  John T Jul 15 '09 at 19:01

10 Answers 10

Use union to create the datatype

union u_tag{
    char ch;
    int d;
    double dl;
};

struct node {
    char type;
    union u_tag u;
    struct node *next;
};

Use struct node to create linked list. type decides what is the datatype of the data.

Harsha T, Bangalore

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Well in a linked list you don't HAVE to link like for like structs together. As long as they have the appropriate forward and/or backwards pointers you are fine. For example:

struct BaseLink
{
   BaseLink* pNext;
   BaseLink* pPrev;
   int       typeId;
};

struct StringLink
{
    BaseLink baseLink;
    char* pString;
};

struct IntLink
{
    BaseLink baseLink;
    int   nInt;
};

This way you'd have a linked list that goes from BaseLink to BaseLink. The extra data is not a problem. You want to see it as a StringLink? Then cast the BaseLink to a StringLink.

Just remember that you need some form of typeid in there so you know what to cast it to when you arrive at it.

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You can use a union type:

enum type_tag {INT_TYPE, DOUBLE_TYPE, STRING_TYPE, R1_TYPE, R2_TYPE, ...};
struct node {
  union {
    int ival;
    double dval;
    char *sval;
    struct recordType1 r1val;
    struct recordType2 r2val;
    ...
  } data;
  enum type_tag dataType;
  struct node *prev;
  struct node *next;
};

Another method I've explored is to use a void* for the data and attach pointers to functions that handle the type-aware stuff:

/**
 * Define a key type for indexing and searching
 */
typedef ... key_t;                 

/**
 * Define the list node type
 */
struct node {
  void *data;
  struct node *prev;
  struct node *next;
  void *(*cpy)(void *);            // make a deep copy of the data
  void (*del)(void *);             // delete the data
  char *(*dpy)(void *);            // format the data for display as a string
  int (*match)(void *, key_t);     // match against a key value
};

/**
 * Define functions for handling a specific data type
 */
void *copyARecordType(void *data)
{
  struct aRecordType v = *(struct aRecordType *) data;
  struct aRecordType *new = malloc(sizeof *new);
  if (new)
  {
    // copy elements of v to new
  }
  return new;
}

void deleteARecordType(void *data) {...}
char *displayARecordType(void *data) {...}
int matchARecordType(void *data, key_t key) {...}

/**
 * Define functions for handling a different type
 */
void *copyADifferentRecordType(void *data) {...}
void deleteADifferentRecordType(void *data) {...}
char *displayADifferentRecordType(void *data) {...}
int matchADifferentRecordType(void *data, key_t key) {...}

/**
 * Function for creating new list nodes
 */
struct node *createNode(void *data, void *(*cpy)(void *), void (*del)(void *), 
    char *(*dpy)(void *), int (*match)(void *, key_t))
{
  struct node *new = malloc(sizeof *new);
  if (new)
  {
    new->cpy = cpy;
    new->del = del;
    new->dpy = dpy;
    new->match = match;
    new->data = new->cpy(data);
    new->prev = new->next = NULL;
  }
  return new;
}

/**
 * Function for deleting list nodes
 */
void deleteNode(struct node *p)
{
  if (p)
    p->del(p->data);
  free(p);
}

/**
 * Add new node to the list; for this example, we just add to the end
 * as in a FIFO queue.  
 */
void addNode(struct node *head, void *data, void *(*cpy)(void*), 
  void (*del)(void *), char *(*dpy)(void *), int (*match)(void*, key_t))
{
  struct node *new = createNode(data, cpy, del, dpy, match);
  if (!head->next)
    head->next = new;
  else
  {
    struct node *cur = head->next;
    while (cur->next != NULL)
      cur = cur->next;
    cur->next = new;
    new->prev = cur;
  }
}

/**
 * Examples of how all of this would be used.
 */
int main(void)
{
  struct aRecordType r1 = {...};
  struct aDifferentRecordType r2 = {...};

  struct node list, *p;
  addNode(&list, &r1, copyARecordType, deleteARecordType, displayARecordType,
    matchARecordType);
  addNode(&list, &r2, copyADifferentRecordType, deleteADifferentRecordType,
    displayADifferentRecordType, matchADifferentRecordType);
  p = list.next;
  while (p)
  {
    printf("Data at node %p: %s\n", (void*) p, p->dpy(p->data));
    p = p->next;
  }
  return 0;
}

Obviously, I've left out some error checking and handling code from this example, and I don't doubt there are a host of problems with it, but it should be illustrative.

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+1 Because I think using a union is less dense than just using a void pointer. It's easier to digest an access like node.data.i than a cast. –  new123456 Mar 9 '11 at 1:59

You can have each node in a linked list have a void* that points to your data. It's up to you how you determine what type of data that pointer is pointing to.

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As said, you can have a node this questionwith a void*. I suggest using something to know about your type :

typedef struct
{
    /* linked list stuff here */    

    char m_type;
    void* m_data;
} 
Node;

See this question.

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Actually, you don't have to put the pointer first in the structure, you can put it anywhere and then find the beginning fo the struct with a containerof() macro. The linux kernel does this with its linked lists.

http://isis.poly.edu/kulesh/stuff/src/klist/

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I use these macros I wrote to make general linked lists. You just create your own struct and use the macro list_link somewhere as a member of the struct. Give that macro one argument naming the struct (without the struct keyword). This implements a doubly linked list without a dummy node (e.g. last node links back around to first node). The anchor is a pointer to the first node which starts out initialized by list_init(anchor) by giving it the lvalue (a dereferenced pointer to it is an lvalue). Then you can use the other macros in the header. Read the source for comments about each available macro functions. This is implemented 100% in macros.

http://phil.ipal.org/pre-release/list-0.0.5.tar.bz2

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If you don't want to have to specify the type of every node in the list via the union solution you can always just store the data in a char* and take type-specific function pointers as parameters to type-sensitive operations such as printing or sorting the list. This way you don't have to worry about what node is what type and can just cast the data however you like.

/* data types */

typedef struct list_node list_node;
struct list_node {
    char *data;
    list_node *next;
    list_node *prev;
};

typedef struct list list;
struct list {
    list_node *head;
    list_node *tail;
    size_t size;
};

/* type sensitive functions */

int list_sort(list *l, int (*compar)(const void*, const void*));
int list_print(list *l, void (*print)(char *data));
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Yes, I do this by defining the list's element's value as a void pointer void*. In order to know the type stored in each element of the list I also have a .type field in there, so I know how to dereference what the pointer is pointing to for each element.

struct node {
    struct node* next;
    int type;
    void* value;
};

Here's a full example of this:

//                                                                                                                                                                                          
// An exercise to play with a struct that stores anything using a void* field.                                                                                                              
//                                                                                                                                                                                          

#include <stdio.h>

#define TRUE 1

int TYPE_INT = 0;
int TYPE_STRING = 1;
int TYPE_BOOLEAN = 2;
int TYPE_PERSON = 3;

struct node {
  struct node* next;
  int type;
  void* value;
};

struct person {
  char* name;
  int age;
};

int main(int args, char **argv) {

  struct person aPerson;
  aPerson.name = "Angel";
  aPerson.age = 35;

  // Define a linked list of objects.                                                                                                                                                       
  // We use that .type field to know what we're dealing                                                                                                                                     
  // with on every iteration. On .value we store our values.                                                                                                                                
  struct node nodes[] = {
    { .next = &nodes[1], .type = TYPE_INT    , .value=1                   },
    { .next = &nodes[2], .type = TYPE_STRING , .value="anyfing, anyfing!" },
    { .next = &nodes[3], .type = TYPE_PERSON , .value=&aPerson            },
    { .next = NULL     , .type = TYPE_BOOLEAN, .value=TRUE                }
  };

  // We iterate through the list                                                                                                                                                            
  for ( struct node *currentNode = &nodes[0]; currentNode;  currentNode = currentNode->next) {
    int currentType = (*currentNode).type;
    if (currentType == TYPE_INT) {
      printf("%s: %d\n", "- INTEGER", (*currentNode).value); // just playing with syntax, same as currentNode->value                                                                        
    } else if (currentType == TYPE_STRING) {
      printf("%s: %s\n", "- STRING", currentNode->value);
    } else if (currentType == TYPE_BOOLEAN) {
      printf("%s: %d\n", "- BOOLEAN (true:1, false:0)", currentNode->value);
    } else if (currentType == TYPE_PERSON) {
        // since we're using void*, we end up with a pointer to struct person, which we *dereference                                                                                        
        // into a struct in the stack.                                                                                                                                                      
        struct person currentPerson = *(struct person*) currentNode->value;
        printf("%s: %s (%d)\n","- TYPE_PERSON", currentPerson.name, currentPerson.age);
      }
  }

    return 0;
}

Expected output:

- INTEGER: 1
- STRING: anyfing, anyfing!
- TYPE_PERSON: Angel (35)
- BOOLEAN (true:1, false:0): 1
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Just an FYI, In C# you can use Object as your data member.

class Node
{
     Node next;
     Object Data;
}

User can then use something like this to find out which Object the Node stores:

if (obj.GetType() == this.GetType()) //
{

}
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1  
You can do that in Java, too, which has about as much to do with C as C# does ;-) –  Steve Jessop Jul 15 '09 at 15:31

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