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I have an array:

array = ["10", "20", "50", "99"]

and want to convert it into a simple comma-separated string list like this:

"10", "20", "50", "99"
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4 Answers 4

up vote 40 down vote accepted
["10", "20", "50","99"].map(&:inspect).join(', ') # => '"10", "20", "50", "99"'
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4  
map{|v| v.to_s.inspect} would handle both integer values and strings. –  tadman Jul 3 '12 at 15:06
    
What happens when array elements contain "? –  dbenhur Jul 3 '12 at 16:59
    
["10", ''].map(&:inspect).join(', ') # => '"10", ""' –  sczizzo Jul 3 '12 at 17:34
2  
I'd fail this in a code review. inspect is not intended to be used in this way. –  Mark Thomas Sep 25 '13 at 22:16
    
@MarkThomas, how would you get desired output? –  dax Jul 15 '14 at 13:43

array.join(',') will do what you want.

array.to_sentence will give you a "1, 2, 3 and 4" style output, which can be useful!

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out of curiosity can it put the Oxford comma in there too? –  eds Jul 3 '12 at 15:13
4  
No, no it wont. Join won't give him quotes. –  Linuxios Jul 3 '12 at 15:14
3  
And just a note, to_sentence only exists in Rails from ActiveSupport. –  Linuxios Jul 3 '12 at 15:15
    
eds, no but this fella had a great anser for that :) stackoverflow.com/questions/6737299/… –  Matt Jul 3 '12 at 15:15
6  
Just tested this in rails 3.2.5. array.to_sentence will include an oxford comma by default. To exclude the oxford comma, you can use array.to_sentence(:last_word_connector => " and ") –  niiru Jul 3 '12 at 16:20

Here:

array.map {|str| "\"#{str}\""}.join(',')
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i got this output => "\"10\",\"20\",\"50\",\"99\"" –  Kashiftufail Jul 3 '12 at 15:02
2  
That output is correct. The backslashes merely indicate that it's a literal quote, not a syntax quote. –  tadman Jul 3 '12 at 15:05
2  
@ali: that is the correct output. the is the escape character so \" stands for the character " whereas the simple " at the start and end is the string delimiter. You are probably printing the result with p x which is equivalent to puts x.inspect, try puts x instead –  Patrick Oscity Jul 3 '12 at 15:05
    
What happens when array elements contain "? –  dbenhur Jul 3 '12 at 16:59
    
@dbenhur: Then you get this string: """. –  Linuxios Jul 3 '12 at 17:13

Several answers have offered solutions using #map, #inspect, #join. All of them fail to get certain details of CSV encoding correct for edge cases involving embedded commas and/or string delimiters in the elements.

It's probably a better idea to use the stdlib class CSV then to roll your own.

irb> require 'csv'
=> true
irb> a = [10,'1,234','J.R. "Bob" Dobbs',3.14159]
=> [10, "1,234", "J.R. \"Bob\" Dobbs", 3.14159]
irb> puts a.to_csv
10,"1,234","J.R. ""Bob"" Dobbs",3.14159

The map.join solutions are sufficient if this encoding doesn't need to care about embedded delimiters, or is intended for some internal representation only, but they will fail if generating data for exchange with other programs that expect Comma Separated Values (CSV) as a generally understood representation.

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I think he just wants that string representation, not full out CSV. –  Linuxios Jul 3 '12 at 17:14
    
it's nice for generating a String of an array which then again can be exported as on field of an CSV amongst other values –  jethroo Jan 31 '13 at 12:47

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