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I have a Bash script that is working on my OpenSuSE box, but when copied across to my Ubuntu box, is not working. The script reads in from a file. The file has fields separated by white space (tabs and spaces).

#!/bin/bash
function test1()
{
    while read LINE
    do
        if [[ $LINE =~ "^$" || $LINE =~ "^#.*" ]] ; then
            continue;
        fi
        set -- $LINE
        local field1=$1
        local field2=$2
    done < test.file
}

test1

with test.file containing:

# Field1Header    Field2Header
abcdef            A-2
ghijkl            B-3

There seem to be two problems:

(1) $field2, the one with the hyphen, is blank

(2) The regex to strip out the blank lines and lines that start with # is not working

Anyone know what's wrong? As I said, it works fine on OpenSuSE.

Thanks, Paul

share|improve this question
1  
Are you actually running it in bash? On Ubuntu, /bin/sh is not bash. –  William Pursell Jul 3 '12 at 15:01
    
Hi. At the top of the file I have "#!/bin/bash". I'll edit my post to that effect. –  user265330 Jul 3 '12 at 15:02
    
local doesn't work outside a function. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 3 '12 at 15:10
    
it's in a function - above is a snippet –  user265330 Jul 3 '12 at 15:11
1  
What versions of Bash are you using on the two systems? –  Dennis Williamson Jul 3 '12 at 15:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Apparently, as of bash 3.2 the regular expression should not be quoted. So this should work:

#!/bin/bash
while read LINE
do
    if [[ $LINE =~ ^$ || $LINE =~ ^#.* ]] ; then
        continue;
    fi
    set -- $LINE
    local field1=$1
    local field2=$2
done < test.file

Edit: you should probably use Jo So's answer as it's definitely cleaner. But I was explaining why the regex fails and the reason behind the different behavior between OpenSuse and Ubuntu(different version of bash, very probably)

share|improve this answer
    
OMG, it is true! (Quoting man bash: Word splitting and pathname expansion are not performed on the words between the [[ and ]];) Bash is an ugly pile of crap, I would never use such ugly extensions! –  Jo So Jul 3 '12 at 15:19
    
Thank you, entropy. –  user265330 Jul 3 '12 at 15:29
1  
@JoSo I fully agree –  entropy Jul 3 '12 at 15:45
    
+1 for this fairness although i was trolling :> –  Jo So Jul 4 '12 at 0:31
  1. Quoting is wrong, that probably accounts for the regex failing.
  2. No need to use bashisms.
  3. No need to use set

Try

while read field1 field2 dummy
do
    if ! test "${field1%%#*}"
    then
        continue
    fi
    # do stuff here
done

EDIT: The obvious version using set

while read -r line
do
    if ! test "${line%%#*}"
    then
        continue
    fi
    set -- $line
    do_stuff_with "$@"
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I have to admit I don't understand the %% syntax. Also, the reason I use set is because I don't have a fixed number of fields on a line; I know my post suggested I do, but I was just trying to simplify as must as possible. –  user265330 Jul 3 '12 at 15:28
    
So XyProblem strikes back. Regarding the %% syntax (that means "remove largest suffix glob-matching #*"), it's POSIX as opposed to the nasty regex bashisms. Look for "Parameter Expansion" –  Jo So Jul 3 '12 at 15:37

On my ubuntu there is no expresion like "=~" for test command. Just use this one:

if [[ $LINE = "" || ${LINE:0:1} = "#" ]] ; then
    continue;
fi
share|improve this answer
    
=~ is a Bash operator for regex matching. If you have Bash, then you have it. The test command (or the equivalent [) don't support it, but the double square bracket form does. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 3 '12 at 15:14

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