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#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    A() { i=1; j=2;};
    A (A &obj) { i= obj.i+100; j= obj.j+100;};
     int i;
     int j;
};

class B:public A
{
public:
    B():A() {i=10; j=20; k=30;};

    B(A &obj) {  A::A(obj); k=10000; };//

    int k;
};

int main()
{ 
    A dog;
    B mouse(dog);
    cout<<mouse.i<<endl;
    cout<<mouse.k<<endl;

    return 0;
}

I try to write a copy constructor for the derived class that takes advantage of the copy constructor for the base class. I expect that mouse.i should be 101, but in fact the compiling result is 1. The value for mouse.k is 10000, which is expected. I was wondering what's wrong with my code.

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2  
Unrelated: member initialization lists are the preferred way of initializing members A() : i(1), j(2) {}. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 3 '12 at 15:08
    
Thanks, and here is just an example. The purpose of the code is to know how to use the copy constructor of the base class. –  feelfree Jul 3 '12 at 15:10
    
By the way, your derived class doesn't have a copy constructor. It has a constructor that takes the base class, but a copy constructor by definition is a ctor that takes the class itself. –  Steve Jessop Jul 3 '12 at 15:17
    
Well the answers are all below, but I'd like to add, I would make the copy constructor take a const reference, just as a matter of good practice: B(const A& obj): A(obj) { k=10000; } –  matiu Jul 3 '12 at 15:31
    
@matiu Not just a matter of good practice, taking a const reference is necessary if you want to be able to copy a temporary object. –  Praetorian Jul 3 '12 at 17:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In this constructor:

B(A &obj) {  A::A(obj); k=10000; };

A::A(obj); does not initialise the base sub-object; instead, it creates a local object also called obj. It's equivalent to A::A obj;, which is equivalant to A obj;. [UPDATE: or possibly it does something else, or possibly it's ill-formed - in any event, it's wrong.]

You want to use an initialiser list:

B(A & obj) : A(obj), k(10000) {}

Also, you almost certainly want the constructor parameters to be A const &, to allow construction from constant objects or temporaries.

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Is A::A valid syntax there? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 3 '12 at 15:12
3  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Yes, a class name is injected into the class scope. A::A::A::A::A is also valid. –  Mike Seymour Jul 3 '12 at 15:13
    
This isn't quite right. A::A(obj) doesn't declare anything, it just creates an object with no references. –  mydogisbox Jul 3 '12 at 15:14
2  
A::A(obj) does not create a local object, it creates unnamed temporary by calling a A copy constructor from obj. –  Suma Jul 3 '12 at 15:18
1  
g++ 4.5.3: error: ‘base::base’ names the constructor, not the type. Inside the class, base (or A in the question) is the type, so base::base does not refer to the type but the constructor (Admittedly clang++ 3.0 does accept the code... but comeau rejects it, and I am not sure of what the standard has to say to this respect) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 3 '12 at 15:18

You must use the initialization list to call the parent's constructor (and you should do it for all other members also):

B(A const& obj) : A(obj), k(10000) {}

Additionally, when copying you do not modify the original object, so you should take a const reference to it. That will allow you to copy from constant objects (or through constant references), improving const-correctness.

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1  
Taking a const reference will also allow copying temporary objects. –  James Kanze Jul 3 '12 at 15:17
    
I got it. I use VC 2010, and it can compile the original codes. –  feelfree Jul 3 '12 at 15:19
    
@feelfree: Yes, that compiler will accept a lot of broken code; if you think you might ever need portability, then it's a good idea to follow the standard. –  Mike Seymour Jul 3 '12 at 15:25

You should initialize the base class like this:

B(A &obj):A(obj) {  k=10000; }

(more on this at C++ superclass constructor calling rules). And a side-note: use const for copy constructor arguments:

A (const A &obj) {...}

EDIT:

The preferred way to initialize instance members is through an initialization list, so your ctor will look like

B(A &obj):A(obj), k(10000) { }
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Thanks, it works. Could someone explain why my code does not work? –  feelfree Jul 3 '12 at 15:13
    
While this answer is not wrong, I believe Davids or Mikes ones are better, as they promote the use of the initialization list for B's members. Not sure why yours was upvoted and their not. –  ereOn Jul 3 '12 at 15:13
    
@ereOn: Probably a timing issue :) This question is right anyway. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 3 '12 at 15:14
    
@ereOn is right, the k(10000) way of initialization is better. I just pointed out the correct way to initialize the base class. –  Alexander Pavlov Jul 3 '12 at 15:14
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
A()
{
    i=1;
    j=2;
}

A (A &obj)
{
    i= obj.i+100;
    j= obj.j+100;
}

 int i;
 int j;
};

class B:public A
{
public:
B():A() {i=10; j=20; k=30;}

B(A &obj)
:A(obj)
 {
  //A::A(obj);
  k=10000;
  }//

int k;
};

int main()
{
    A dog;
    B mouse(dog);
    cout<<mouse.i<<endl;
    cout<<mouse.k<<endl;

    return 0;
}

This work for me

B(A &obj)
{
    A::A(obj)
}

Is illegal on gcc compiler

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