Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have one file with -| as delimiter after each section...need to create separate files for each section using unix.

example of input file

wertretr
ewretrtret
1212132323
000232
-|
ereteertetet
232434234
erewesdfsfsfs
0234342343
-|
jdhg3875jdfsgfd
sjdhfdbfjds
347674657435
-|

Expected result in File 1

wertretr
ewretrtret
1212132323
000232
-|

Expected result in File 2

ereteertetet
232434234
erewesdfsfsfs
0234342343
-|

Expected result in File 3

jdhg3875jdfsgfd
sjdhfdbfjds
347674657435
-|
share|improve this question
1  
Are you writing a program or do you want to do this using command line utilities? –  rkyser Jul 3 '12 at 15:13
1  
using command line utilities will be preferable.. –  user1499178 Jul 3 '12 at 15:27
    
You could use awk, it would be easy to write a 3 or 4 line program to do it. Unfortunately I am out of practice. –  richard Jul 3 '12 at 15:41
add comment

8 Answers

awk '{print $0 " -|"> "file" NR}' RS='-\\|'  input-file
share|improve this answer
    
I like that this is short, but it doesn't work. It created 135 files with '-|' in each one (except one). Edit: It works now –  rkyser Jul 3 '12 at 16:07
    
@rkyser. The | needs to be escaped. Twice. Answer edited. –  William Pursell Jul 3 '12 at 16:08
1  
It is short, but did you test it. (+0) –  richard Jul 3 '12 at 16:09
1  
you fixed it (+1), but next time don't forget to test. –  richard Jul 3 '12 at 16:10
    
How well does this work on really big files (> 3 GB)? I'm not familiar with awk. –  rzetterberg Jun 30 '13 at 10:10
add comment

A one liner, no programming. (except the regexp etc.)

csplit --digits=2  --quiet --prefix=outfile infile "/-|/+1" "{*}"
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - shorter: csplit -n2 -s -b outfile infile "/-|/+1" "{*}" –  zb226 May 28 at 12:04
    
@zb226 I did it in long, so that no explanation was needed. –  richard Jun 7 at 10:45
add comment

Debian has csplit, but I don't know if that's common to all/most/other distributions. If not, though, it shouldn't be too hard to track down the source and compile it...

share|improve this answer
    
I agree. My Debian box says that csplit is part of gnu coreutils. So any Gnu operating system, such as all the Gnu/Linux distros will have it. Wikipedia also mentions 'The Single UNIX® Specification, Issue 7' on the csplit page, so I suspect you got it. –  richard Jul 3 '12 at 15:52
1  
Since csplit is in POSIX, I would expect it to be available on essentially all Unix-like systems. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 3 '12 at 15:54
    
Although csplit is POISX, the problem (it seems doing a test with it on the Ubuntu system sitting in front of me) is that there is no obvious way to make it use a more modern regex syntax. Compare: csplit --prefix gold-data - "/^==*$/ vs csplit --prefix gold-data - "/^=+$/. At least GNU grep has -e. –  new123456 Sep 14 '13 at 17:09
add comment

I solved a slightly different problem, where the file contains a line with the name where the text that follows should go. This perl code does the trick for me:

    #! perl

#comment the line below for UNIX systems
use Win32::Clipboard;

# Get command line flags

#print ($#ARGV, "\n");
if($#ARGV == -1) {
    print STDERR "usage: \ncsplit.pl --mff -- filename.txt [...] \n\nNote that no space is allowed between the '--' and the related parameter.\n\nThe mff is found on a line followed by a filename.  All of the contents of filename.txt are written to that file until another mff is found.\n";
    exit;
}

# this package sets the ARGV count variable to -1;

use Getopt::Long;
my $mff = "";
$file_switch = GetOptions('mff' => \$mff);

# set a default $mff variable
if ($mff == "") {$mff = "-#-"};
print ("using file switch=", $mff, "\n\n");

while($_ = shift @ARGV) {
    if(-f "$_") {
    push @filelist, $_;
    } 
}

# Could be more than one file name on the command line, 
# but this version throws away the subsequent ones.

$readfile = $filelist[0];

open SOURCEFILE, "<$readfile" or die "File not found...\n\n";
#print SOURCEFILE;

while (<SOURCEFILE>) {
  /^$mff (.*$)/o;
    $outname = $1;
#   print $outname;
#   print "right is: $1 \n";

if (/^$mff /) {

    open OUTFILE, ">$outname" ;
    print "opened $outname\n";
    }
    else {print OUTFILE "$_"};
  }
share|improve this answer
add comment
cat file| ( I=0; echo -n "">file0; while read line; do echo $line >> file$I; if [ "$line" == '-|' ]; then I=$[I+1]; echo -n "" > file$I; fi; done )

and the formated version:

#!/bin/bash
cat FILE | (
  I=0;
  echo -n"">file0;
  while read line; 
  do
    echo $line >> file$I;
    if [ "$line" == '-|' ];
    then I=$[I+1];
      echo -n "" > file$I;
    fi;
  done;
)
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can also use awk. I'm not very familiar with awk, but the following did seem to work for me. It generated part1.txt, part2.txt, part3.txt, and part4.txt. Do note, that the last partn.txt file that this generates is empty. I'm not sure how fix that, but I'm sure it could be done with a little tweaking. Any suggestions anyone?

awk_pattern file:

BEGIN{ fn = "part1.txt"; n = 1 }
{
   print > fn
   if (substr($0,1,2) == "-|") {
       close (fn)
       n++
       fn = "part" n ".txt"
   }
}

bash command:

awk -f awk_pattern input.file

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is a perl code that will do the thing

#!/usr/bin/perl
open(FI,"file.txt") or die;
$cur=0;
open(FO,">res.$cur.txt") or die;
while(<FI>)
{
    print FO $_;
    if(/^-\|/)
    {
        close(FO);
        $cur++;
        open(FO,">res.$cur.txt") or die;
    }
}
close(FO);
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is the sort of problem I wrote context-split for: http://stromberg.dnsalias.org/~strombrg/context-split.html

$ ./context-split -h
usage:
./context-split [-s separator] [-n name] [-z length]
        -s specifies what regex should separate output files
        -n specifies how output files are named (default: numeric
        -z specifies how long numbered filenames (if any) should be
        -i include line containing separator in output files
        operations are always performed on stdin
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.