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I'm working on an Android application that uses sockets. I have a function called initializeStreams() which opens the socket and attempts a connection. This function throws a ConnectException if the connection could not be established. But for some reason, in the code that calls initializeStreams(), which has a catch block for ConnectException, the log prints out its own stack trace for the exception instead of going to the catch block. The catch block is never reached at all, even though the exact exception is being thrown. Here's the code:

The try block:

try {
        initializeStreams();

            /* other code */

    } catch (ConnectException e) {
        Log.i(TAG, "caught connect exception");

    }

initializeStreams():

    public void initializeStreams() throws ConnectException {
    try {
        Log.i(TAG, "Attempting to connect");

        requestSocket = new Socket(SERVER_ADDR, PORT);

                    /* other code */


    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

I can't figure this out, so any help would be much appreciated.

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We cannot figure out why that's happening since the only socket operation that you posted in your code does not throw a ConnectException. Post the rest of the code. –  Th0rndike Jul 3 '12 at 15:16
    
Yea. The Log right before the socket initialization is printed, then the ConnectException stack trace is printed, instead of the Log that's in the catch block. initializeStreams() is the only function that throws ConnectException and the first code snippet is the only place where it's called. –  aakbari1024 Jul 3 '12 at 15:19
    
what do you mean? That socket operation is the one that throws the exception, it says so in the stack trace, and it's the only socket operation in my program at the moment. –  aakbari1024 Jul 3 '12 at 15:22
    
I don't see any method that throws ConnectException here: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/net/Socket.html –  Th0rndike Jul 3 '12 at 15:26
    
@Th0rndike ConnectException extends SocketException. –  EJP Jul 3 '12 at 15:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to chain your Exception throwing it in the catch block. Try the following:

public void initializeStreams() throws ConnectException {
try {
    Log.i(TAG, "Attempting to connect");

    requestSocket = new Socket(SERVER_ADDR, PORT);

                /* other code */


} catch(ConnectException e){
    throw e;
}

catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
    
this fixed it, thanks! –  aakbari1024 Jul 3 '12 at 15:37
    
Strange, because it doesn't even compile in the pre-edit form. The edited version of initializeStreams() contains a futile catch/throw sequence that would be better omitted completely. –  EJP Jul 3 '12 at 15:41
    
@EJP yes you are right. The edited version does have a futile try/catch block. I have corrected my post. Thanks for pointing that error. –  Arun George Jul 3 '12 at 15:46
    
The first version still doesn't compile: the catches are in the wrong order. The edited version should catch ConnectException specifically instead of using an instanceof test, and initializeStreams() only needs to throw IOException, not Exception: the latter is poor practice. –  EJP Jul 4 '12 at 0:11
    
I did some research and found that using instanceOf for exceptions is not a recommended practice. I have removed that completely. But the catch block are in the right order and should work if the code inside the try does throw a ConnectException or IOException. –  Arun George Jul 4 '12 at 4:38

ConnectException extends SocketException which in turn extends IOException, so the catch for IOException in initializeStreams() catches the ConnectException. I would just remove that try/catch block altogether: there's not much point in returning cleanly from this method without a connection.

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