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I'm in the process of porting over another shell script when I came across the following:

if [[ ! -x $DVDREC ]]; then
  print "ERROR: $DVDREC not found. Exiting ..."
  exit 1
fi

if [[ ! -c ${DVDDEV} ]]; then
  print "ERROR: ${DVDDEV} not found. Exiting ..."
  exit 1
fi

I was wondering what the -c and -x options actually do with regards to the strings stored in DVDREC and DVDDEV?

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1  
what man page says??? –  Prince John Wesley Jul 3 '12 at 15:17
2  
RTFM man test –  Xaerxess Jul 3 '12 at 15:17
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3 Answers

From "help test" in a bash shell:

  -c FILE        True if file is character special.
  -x FILE        True if the file is executable by you.
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// man test

   -c FILE
          FILE exists and is character special

   -x FILE
          FILE exists and execute (or search) permission is granted
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+1 Nice answer =) –  vitaut Jul 3 '12 at 15:17
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Citing man test:

   -c FILE
          FILE exists and is character special

   -x FILE
          FILE exists and execute (or search) permission is granted
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+1 Nice answer =) –  rush Jul 3 '12 at 15:18
    
Thanks for your help. I'm fairly new to the Linux Operating System so I wasn't aware that there was a manpage for test. –  Justin Jul 3 '12 at 15:19
1  
@Justin: No problems. For people who are new to bash the relationship between [ and test is not obvious. So it's a good question. –  vitaut Jul 3 '12 at 15:26
1  
@justin - the manpage isn't for the test command that you would be using. The test builtin or [ would be used first. In your case, you are using a bash keyword [[, rather than a command. The flags are the same. –  jordanm Jul 3 '12 at 15:27
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