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I am writing an R package called slidify which makes it easy to generate reproducible HTML5 slides from R Markdown files. The package makes use of css and js files from several existing HTML5 slide generation frameworks like dzslides, deck.js etc. Currently, I have organized the downloaded versions of these external assets in the inst/libraries folder of slidify, so that it is automatically available for users upon installation. While this approach is simple, there are some disadvantages:

  1. These frameworks are constantly updated on github. Under the current setup, I would have to push a new version of the package everytime any of these frameworks are updated.

  2. If I make any tweaks to the default css and js that come with these frameworks, then I need to merge the updates carefully so that I don't lose slidify specific customizations.

I had a couple of thoughts on how to manage this.

  1. Don't package these libraries with slidify. Instead, provide a function that would allow users to add the frameworks they desire.

  2. Add these frameworks to the inst\libraries folder on slidify, but as submodules. Now, I have no idea if adding them as submodules would get them installed if someone were to use devtools::install_github.

So my question is, when writing an R package how can I manage external non-R dependencies which are updated constantly?

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I really like your question; tweaked the phrasing at the end to ward off "not constructive" votes. –  joran Jul 3 '12 at 15:37
    
Thanks for the edit. It makes the question cleaner. –  Ramnath Jul 3 '12 at 15:40
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One possibility is to look at packages xlsx and XLConnect. Both depend on Java libraries. xlsx defines (and depends on) a stand-alone package xlsxjars that only contains the libraries. In this way, the downstream code is decoupled from the libraries. –  Andrie Jul 3 '12 at 15:51
    
Thanks Andrie! I will look into it. –  Ramnath Jul 3 '12 at 16:03
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Freezing the version of the dependancies along with the version of the package seems like the safest way. In case one of the packages changes substancially then your package can still work without having to hurry massively to fix the broken dependancies. Also best not to overwrite the dependancy files but overload instead and load after the originals, makes things more manageable. –  Hansi Jul 3 '12 at 16:55
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One analogous situation is to look at the packages xlsx and XLConnect.

Both packages depend on Java libraries. xlsx defines (and depends on) a stand-alone package xlsxjars that only contains the libraries.

In this way, the downstream code is decoupled from the libraries.

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I solved a similar issue by using git-subtree. Have a look at: Managing 3rd party sources and binaries used by code under source control

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