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I have this code:

  #include<stdio.h>                                   
  int main()
  {   
      int a=10;
      switch(a)
      {   
      case '1':
          printf("ONE\n");
          break;
      case '2':
          printf("TWO\n");
          break;
      defalut:
          printf("NONE\n");
      }   
      return 0;
  }

The program doesn't print anything, not even NONE. I figured out that default had a typo defalut!
I want to know why this syntax error is not detected by the compiler.

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3  
this is a great example why YOU DON'T USE GOTO GUYS YOU ARE SETTING YOURSELF UP FOR FAILURE. –  Hans Z Jul 3 '12 at 16:40
2  
@Hans - OP didn't use GOTO. Unfortunately, it's part of the language and the compiler didn't notice that the label was unused. –  Ted Hopp Jul 3 '12 at 16:41
3  
I'm not saying OP used GOTO, I'm just saying any construct where for:, defalut:, if:, void:, do:, and this: are valid is going to make your programming needless hard to debug. –  Hans Z Jul 3 '12 at 16:43
9  
Did you enable all warnings on your compiler? –  Kerrek SB Jul 3 '12 at 16:45
3  
@KerrekSB - cool ! the warning shows up when i compile it with the -Wall switch. –  insane Jul 3 '12 at 19:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

defalut is just a label in your program that you can jump to with goto. Having an editor that highlights keywords could have made this error easier to spot.

I should also note that your program may have some logic errors. The character '1' is not the same as 1, and the same with '2' and 2.

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3  
Nice. The statement label probably also suppressed an "unreachable code" warning for the last printf. –  Ted Hopp Jul 3 '12 at 16:38
    
Wow... Just wow. That's a nasty bug. –  Daniel Jul 3 '12 at 16:44

That's not a syntax error. defalut is a valid label, and it could be the target of a goto.

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tip: if you are using gcc, add the option -pedantic. it will warn you for unused labels:

$ gcc -ansi -Wall -pedantic test.c -o test
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:14:10: warning: label ‘defalut’ defined but not used
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