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I'm storing JSON objects in Amazon S3, and I'd like to load that data directly from S3 from Javascript. My GET looks pretty generic:

$.ajax({
    'type':'GET',
    'url':'http://s3.amazonaws.com/mybucketname/'+id,
    'dataType':'text',
    'success':function(msg) {
        alert(msg);
    }
});

I get the following error:

XMLHttpRequest cannot load http://s3.amazonaws.com/whatever/whatever. Origin http://mylocalhostname:9000 is not allowed by Access-Control-Allow-Origin.

I can get that URL from S3 using curl, or by navigating there directly from my browser. Am I really going to have to proxy all of these requests through my own servers?

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possible duplicate of Amazon S3 and Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) –  epascarello Jul 3 '12 at 17:23
    
Or another dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/8674776/… Shows JSONP solution. –  epascarello Jul 3 '12 at 17:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

S3 now supports Cross Domain Requests using CORS file

You can find more information here

http://docs.amazonwebservices.com/AmazonS3/latest/dev/cors.html#how-do-i-enable-cors

and

http://aws.typepad.com/aws/2012/08/amazon-s3-cross-origin-resource-sharing.html

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5  
This isn't a cors file, but a cors subresource. So for those who try to dump a file named cors in your bucket, that won't work. (I tried this myself.) –  Michael Mior May 14 '13 at 13:00
    
Just a note on the cors for S3. When applying a policy, files already in the bucket are NOT updated. So make sure you apply a CORS policy to only new buckets, or re-add the content after applying the policy. –  samsamm777 Jul 24 '14 at 13:37

S3 doesn't send the 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header if you use the wildcard * like:

<AllowedOrigin>*</AllowedOrigin>

To force s3 sending the AllowedOrigin header but still let your content be loaded from any site, use this:

<AllowedOrigin>http://*</AllowedOrigin>
<AllowedOrigin>https://*</AllowedOrigin>
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1  
Searched all over, this was the solution for me. Not in Amazon's docs but worked immediately. You can list all three in the same CORS rule –  praterade Dec 2 '14 at 22:28
    
Likewise, of all the attempted fixes I made, this was the silver bullet. –  Christian Dec 10 '14 at 2:36

You can use a jsonp request instead of json. Here are the details. http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

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2  
Yes but please see the Amazon CORS docs as well as this is a (recent) Amazon-supported option for selective enabling of domains. –  Dean Radcliffe Dec 17 '12 at 21:53

Searched a lot - This is the sample solution:

http://blog.bignerdranch.com/1670-upload-directly-to-amazon-s3-with-support-for-cors/

(Add cors on bucket permissions tab)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<CORSConfiguration xmlns="http://s3.amazonaws.com/doc/2006-03-01/">
    <CORSRule>
        <AllowedOrigin>*</AllowedOrigin>
        <AllowedMethod>GET</AllowedMethod>
        <MaxAgeSeconds>3000</MaxAgeSeconds>
        <AllowedHeader>*</AllowedHeader>
    </CORSRule>
</CORSConfiguration>
share|improve this answer

I was struggling with the same sort of issue. only difference is i wanted to pull a file with Ajax from my S3 and load it into a site.

After a lot of searching i ended up adding this option to my Ajax request.

xhrFields: { withCredentials: true },

Worked like a charm, as long as you have the CORSConfiguration to allow all.

hope it helps.

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