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I've got a int that I want to convert to 3 ints for the index of a 3d array, here's an example of what I'm on about.

byte[,,] array = new byte[XSize, YSize, ZSize];

int i = 0;

//other code

array[#,#,#] = cur;

//other code

I don't know how to get the correct numbers for the #,#,# from just i.

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Which way do you want to loop through it? –  Hexxagonal Jul 3 '12 at 17:58
1  
Could you provide more information? Are you trying to iterate over all items? Or are you attempting to directly access a single element from a single lookup value? –  Jaime Torres Jul 3 '12 at 17:58
    
My previous comment still holds: Can you provide an input and the expected output? –  Austin Salonen Jul 3 '12 at 17:59
    
I think you are trying to map (0,0,0) to 0, (0,0,1) to 1 and so on. Is that what you want? Could you clarify your question? –  James Jul 3 '12 at 17:59
1  
@Lost Its better to improve previous question rather than posting new question..... –  pratap k Jul 3 '12 at 18:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Supposing you want to iterate through Z, then Y, and then X. . .

int zDirection = i % zLength;
int yDirection = (i / zLength) % yLength;
int xDirection = i / (yLength * zLength); 
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Fixed for the other order. –  BlackVegetable Jul 3 '12 at 18:08

You have to make an assumption about the orientation of the arrayspace. Assuming you are mapping the numbers with 0 corresponding to 0, 0, 0 and that you iterate z then y then x, the math is fairly simple:

int x;
int y;
int z;

if (i < XSize * YSize * ZSize)
{
    int zQuotient = Math.DivRem(i, ZSize, out z);
    int yQuotient = Math.DivRem(xQuotient, YSize, out y);
    x = yQuotient % XSize;
}

Note that this saves some redundant operations over BlackVegetable's solution. For a 3, 3, 3 matrix this yields the set:

i (x, y, z)
0 (0, 0, 0)
1 (0, 0, 1)
2 (0, 0, 2)
3 (0, 1, 0)
4 (0, 1, 1)
5 (0, 1, 2)
6 (0, 2, 0)
7 (0, 2, 1)
8 (0, 2, 2)
9 (1, 0, 0)
10 (1, 0, 1)
11 (1, 0, 2)
12 (1, 1, 0)
13 (1, 1, 1)
14 (1, 1, 2)
15 (1, 2, 0)
16 (1, 2, 1)
17 (1, 2, 2)
18 (2, 0, 0)
19 (2, 0, 1)
20 (2, 0, 2)
21 (2, 1, 0)
22 (2, 1, 1)
23 (2, 1, 2)
24 (2, 2, 0)
25 (2, 2, 1)
26 (2, 2, 2)
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