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I have a Java application that is structured as:

  • One thread watching a java.nio.Selector for IO.
  • A java.util.concurrent.ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor thread pool handling either work to be done immediately — dispatching IO read by the IO thread — or work to be done after a delay, usually errors.

The ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor has an upper bound on the number of threads to create; currently 5000 in the app, but I haven't tuned that number at all.

After running the app for a while, I get thousands and thousands of threads that have this stack trace:

"pool-1-thread-5262" prio=10 tid=0x00007f636c2df800 nid=0x2516 waiting on condition [0x00007f60246a5000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: TIMED_WAITING (parking)
        at sun.misc.Unsafe.park(Native Method)
        - parking to wait for  <0x0000000581c49520> (a java.util.concurrent.locks.AbstractQueuedSynchronizer$ConditionObject)
        at java.util.concurrent.locks.LockSupport.parkNanos(LockSupport.java:196)
        at java.util.concurrent.locks.AbstractQueuedSynchronizer$ConditionObject.awaitNanos(AbstractQueuedSynchronizer.java:2025)
        at java.util.concurrent.DelayQueue.poll(DelayQueue.java:209)
        at java.util.concurrent.ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor$DelayedWorkQueue.poll(ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor.java:611)
        at java.util.concurrent.ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor$DelayedWorkQueue.poll(ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor.java:602)
        at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor.getTask(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:945)
        at java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor$Worker.run(ThreadPoolExecutor.java:907)
        at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:662)

I assume that the above is being caused by my calls to schedule(java.lang.Runnable, long, java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit), which certainly happens often in the app. Is this the expected behavior?

Having all of these threads hanging around doesn't seem to impact the application at all — if a worker thread is needed, it does not appear like these TIMED_WAITING threads prevent tasks from running when submitted through the submit method, but I'm not totally sure of that. Does having thousands of threads hanging around in this parked state impact the app or system performance?

Tasks that are submitted via the schedule method are very simple: they basically just re-schedule the Channel back with the Selector. So, these tasks are not very long-lived, they just need to execute at some point in the future. Normal worker threads will do traditional blocking-IO to perform their work, and are generally more long-lived.

A related question: is it better to do delayed tasks in an explicit, single thread instead of using the schedule method? That is, have a loop like this:

DelayedQueue<SomeTaskClass> tasks = ...;
while (true) {
    task<SomeTaskClass> = tasks.take();
    threadpool.submit(task);
}

Does DelayQueue use any worker threads to implement its functionality? I was going to just experiment with it today, but advice would be well appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
I told you I haven't tuned that number yet, and it's not exactly relevant to my question. And yes, generally, all worker threads are waiting for IO, not doing much computation at all. –  Casey Marshall Jul 3 '12 at 18:11
    
But yes, thanks for the irrelevant comment. –  Casey Marshall Jul 3 '12 at 18:14

1 Answer 1

After running the app for a while, I get thousands and thousands of threads that have this stack trace.

Unless you actually plan on having 5000 threads all operating at once, that is a too high number. If they are blocked on IO then that should be fine. Unless you are starting with a minimum number of threads that is too large, then their existence in your thread dump means that at some point they were all needed to process the tasks submitted to the executor. So at some point you had 5000 tasks being run at once -- blocking or whatever. If you show the actual executor constructor call I can be more specific.

If you have the time, playing with that upper bound might be good to see if it does affect application behavior.

Does having thousands of threads hanging around in this parked state impact the app or system performance?

They will take up more memory which may affect JVM performance but otherwise it should not impact the application unless too many are running at once. They may just be wasting some system resources which is the only reason why I'd play with the 5000 and other executor constructor args.

is it better to do delayed tasks in an explicit, single thread instead of using the schedule method?

I'd say no. Just about anytime you can replace by-hand thread code with a use of the ExecutorService classes it is a good thing. I think the idea of doing a task and then delaying for a while is a great use of the ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor.

Does DelayQueue use any worker threads to implement its functionality?

No. It is just a BlockingQueue implementation that helps with delaying of tasks. I've never used the class actually, although I would have if I'd known about it. The ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor uses this class to do its job so using DelayQueue yourself is again a waste. Just stick with STPE.

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