Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Evaluating different server solutions, I need to understand how Play2 handles concurrency when using Iteratees and in particular when handling Websockets requests.

If you look at this code showing a simple websocket server with shared state (A collaborative paint app) https://github.com/gre/playpainter/blob/master/scala/app/controllers/Application.scala

You will see that each websocket request can potentially modify shared state such as the painters map or the connections counter. Is this code thread safe ? if it is (The author confirmed it) how is the concurrency handled internally by Play2 ? At this point, I don't have the Scala level to fully understand the play2 lib code unfortunately.

I'm wondering how they can conciliate thread safety (the map or the counter can only be modified by one thread at a time) with high performance (Multiple requests can be processed "simultaneously".

The only workable behavior I can think of is them wrapping each iteratee chunk's processing inside its own thread transaction; Which end up severely limiting concurrency (Although simplifying the user code) and end up with performances similar to what Node.js or any single threaded server would provide? I can see the benefit of the Iteratee programming model for streaming, file handling, etc but not so much for websockets where each request triggers non trivial work to do (server computation, database access, etc)

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was wrong about the thread-safety of my app, it had a bug.

I've just fix it using ConcurrentHashMap, see changes https://github.com/gre/playpainter/commit/5120de5b77627836fe26602546f82c99a28cdf1b

Thanks for your report.

share|improve this answer
    
Now it all makes sense... :) –  AlexG Jul 5 '12 at 23:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.