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I'm trying to send some data to a device using serial comunication:

void VcpBridge::write_speed(char address, int spd) {
    uint8_t speed = (uint8_t)(127);
    ROS_ERROR("VCP BRIDGE: Sending %u to %u", speed, address);
    char msg[8];
    char command = 0x55, size = 0x02, csum;
    csum = speed + 0x64 + address;
    sprintf(msg, "%c%c%c%c%c%c", command, address, speed, size, 0x64, csum);
    ROS_ERROR(msg);
    write(fd_, msg, 6);
}

ROS_ERROR here does the same as printf.

Everything works fine except when the value of speed is over 127. Then it always prints a ? in it's position and the device doesn't recive the right info. Do you know any way to cast it correctly? I've tried %u but then the program crashes.

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Are you trying to print speed as a char? What do you expect to get when it equals, say, 200? –  Eitan T Jul 3 '12 at 19:16
    
I presume you've stripped out some code for the sake of example, but in case you haven't, you do realize that you never put any values into msg before you write() it, don't you? Also, perhaps you should replace all the chars with unsigned chars (or uint8_t, which is typically just an alias for the same...). –  twalberg Jul 3 '12 at 19:17
1  
@twalberg He did, with sprintf(msg, ...); –  Eitan T Jul 3 '12 at 19:18
    
@EitanT Doh... my bad... I read fprintf(), not sprintf(). –  twalberg Jul 3 '12 at 19:19
    
In fact is not a matter o what I print, I only need the info to be there. –  David Fornas Jul 3 '12 at 19:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no good reason to use sprintf in your example. Try this:

void VcpBridge::write_speed(char address, int spd) {
    uint8_t speed = (uint8_t)(127);
    ROS_ERROR("VCP BRIDGE: Sending %u to %u", speed, address);
    char command = 0x55, size = 0x02, csum;
    csum = speed + 0x64 + address;
    ROS_ERROR(msg);
    char msg[] = { command, address, speed, size, 0x64, csum};
    write(fd_, msg, sizeof msg);
}
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1  
+1, but note all the mixing of types still going on (char, uint8_t, and--implicitly--int and unsigned int). Implicit integral promotions were likely the cause of the problem in the original code. To avoid future problems (like what happens if the csum value is truncated) I would write the code using one type, probably uint8_t, eliminate as many conversions as possible, and make the necessary ones explicit (with casts). –  Adrian McCarthy Jul 3 '12 at 20:07

Thanks to your answer I could figure out hot to fix the problem. Not using sprintf and using unsigned int was the kay.There's the final code:

void VcpBridge::write_speed(char address,int spd){
  uint8_t speed = (uint8_t)(200);
  unsigned char command = 0x55, size=0x02, csum;
  csum=speed+0x64+address;
  unsigned char msg[8]= { command, address, speed, size, 0x64, csum };
  write( fd_, msg, 6);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It isn't vital, but you may give your array a dimension of 6. You give it eight bytes but only use six of them. –  Robᵩ Jul 3 '12 at 20:07
    
That's true, I did that before knowing the message size. –  David Fornas Jul 3 '12 at 20:38

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