Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a key type:

struct KeyT {
    uint32_t timestamp;

    // example!
    uint32_t a;
    uint32_t b;
    uint32_t c;
    uint32_t d;
    uint32_t e;
    // ...

    bool operator== (const KeyT& key) const
    {
        if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b == key.b && d == key.d && c == key.c && e == key.e)
            return true;
        return false;

    }
    bool operator< (const KeyT& key) const
    {
        if(timestamp < key.timestamp)
            return true;
        else if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a < key.a && b < key.b && c < key.c && d < key.d && e < key.e)
            return true;
        else if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b < key.b && c < key.c && d < key.d && e < key.e)
            return true;
        else if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b == key.b && c < key.c && d < key.d && e < key.e)
            return true;
        else if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b == key.b && c == key.c && d < key.d && e < key.e)
            return true;
        else if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b == key.b && c == key.c && d == key.d && e < key.e)
            return true;
        // ..
        return false;
    }
};

Now, I don't really care about the sorting on member vars a, b, c, d, e, the only thing I want to ensure is that the map is sorted on timestamp. I also just realized that if I have two instances of KeyT one, two, where everything is the same except for "d", then both one < two, and two < one would be false. The only way to fix that is to write comparisons for all possible combinations of all member variables.. I'm fairly certain I'm missing something obvious, so what's the best solution in this case?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
If you have identical items then "one < two and two < one" will always be false by definition. Can you clarify the problem? –  Jay Jul 3 '12 at 19:12
    
They aren't identical, they differ in member variable d. –  Kim Sun-wu Jul 3 '12 at 19:13
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think this does what you need:

bool operator< (const KeyT& key) const
{
    if(timestamp != key.timestamp) return timestamp < key.timestamp;
    else if ( a != key.a ) return a < key.a;
    else if ( b != key.b ) return b < key.b;
    else if ( c != key.c ) return c < key.c;
    else if ( d != key.d ) return d < key.d;
    else return e < key.e;
}

This is a sensible if ugly pattern to use whenever you have a prioritised list of variables you want to sort on within a comparable class.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was looking for! I knew I was missing something obvious. –  Kim Sun-wu Jul 3 '12 at 19:18
2  
Glad to be of service. I've written that a few times. By the way, boost::tuple can be used for this sort of thing. It has an ordering function in tuple_comparison.hpp which does this prioritised, element-by-element ordering. I often use it for quick and dirty sorting of data without needing to write a new class or ordering function. –  Alex Wilson Jul 3 '12 at 19:21
    
I would pack it to std::binary_function class and add it as a template parameter. –  Naszta Jul 3 '12 at 19:44
    
@Naszta: I don't see how that would make it any less verbose? –  Kim Sun-wu Jul 3 '12 at 19:53
    
@KimSun-wu: this is the reason. –  Naszta Jul 3 '12 at 19:55
add comment

First, you should compare only the next current key that has not been compared for being less than, and drop the else after return, like this:

bool operator< (const KeyT& key) const
{
    if(timestamp < key.timestamp)
        return true;
    if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a < key.a)
        return true;
    if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b < key.b)
        return true;
    if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b == key.b && c < key.c)
        return true;
    if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b == key.b && c == key.c && d < key.d)
        return true;
    if(timestamp == key.timestamp && a == key.a && b == key.b && c == key.c && d == key.d && e < key.e)
        return true;
    // ..
    return false;
}

If you need to compare only the timestamp, leave the first if, and delete the remaining ones:

bool operator< (const KeyT& key) const
{
    return timestamp < key.timestamp;
}

When you use this operator for comparing your keys, the items with identical timestamp will not be reordered.

share|improve this answer
    
This works too, but does it provide anything over Alex's answer? –  Kim Sun-wu Jul 3 '12 at 19:18
    
@KimSun-wu No, it's simply a different way of writing the same condition. It may be a little more natural to read, because it can be translated to a human language in exactly the same terms as people tend to think about resolving ties in sorting orders, but other than that the two should produce identical results. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 3 '12 at 19:21
    
Maybe it's just me, but I find Alex's version simpler/more intuitive to read. –  jrok Jul 3 '12 at 19:22
add comment

If all you care about is the timestamp, and the other attributes just don't matter, you can use the following which is a strict weak ordering. You'll just never know what order the objects of the same timestamp will appear:

bool operator< (const KeyT& key) const
{
    return timestamp < key.timestamp;
}

If you need to order on all the attributes I suggest boost::tie:

bool operator< (const KeyT& key) const
{
    return boost::tie(timestamp, a, b, c, d, e) < boost::tie(key.timestamp, key.a, key.b, key.c, key.d, e.key);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The first won't work, because std::map considers two objects equal if 1 < 2 && 2 < 1, which would be true if the timestamps are equal but they differ elsewhere. –  Kim Sun-wu Jul 3 '12 at 19:43
    
@Kim Sun-wu By saying Now, I don't really care about the sorting on member vars a, b, c, d, e you've said that as far as the map is concerned such objects are equal. You can still use operator== to confirm that the object matches one you expect. I probably simply misunderstand your needs. Do you need to be able to have the map directly find an exact match for a given key object as well as be sorted primarily by timestamp? –  Mark B Jul 3 '12 at 20:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.