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I made a program in Idle that says:

for trial in range(3):
if input('Password:') == 'password':
    break
else:
    # didn't find password after 3 attempts
    **I need a stop program here**
print ("Welcome in")

Remember, this is in Idle, so I need program for Idle, not CMD. I also am using Python 3.2, if that helps.

share|improve this question
    
it a if-else or for-else? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 3 '12 at 19:46
    
Why does it matter if it's in IDLE or CMD? –  Michael0x2a Jul 3 '12 at 19:56
    
@Ashwini Chaudhary If else –  astronautlevel Jul 3 '12 at 21:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

use sys.exit() or raise SystemExit

import sys
for trial in range(3):
    if input('Password:') == 'password':
        break
else:
    sys.exit()
print ("Welcome in"))

Edit: To end it silently wrap it in a try-except block:

try:
    import sys
    for trial in range(1):
        if raw_input('Password:') == 'password':
            break
    else:
        raise SystemExit #or just sys.exit()
    print ("Welcome in")
except SystemExit:
    pass  #when the program throws SysExit do nothing here,i.e end silently
share|improve this answer
    
I get an error saying: Traceback (most recent call last): File "F:\password.py", line 8, in <module> sys.exit() SystemExit –  astronautlevel Jul 3 '12 at 19:54
    
@astronautlevel yes that's how sys.exit() works. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 3 '12 at 19:55
    
That's expected behavior -- sys.exit() raises SystemExit, which tells Python to terminate the program. –  Michael0x2a Jul 3 '12 at 19:57
    
@astronautlevel solution edited. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 3 '12 at 20:03
    
thanks! this helped me a lot –  astronautlevel Jul 3 '12 at 20:03

A much nicer way to do this IMHO would be to put your program into a function and return when you want it to stop. Then just call the function to run your program.

def main():
    for trial in range(3):
        if input('Password:') == 'password':
            break
    else:
        return
    print ("Welcome in")

main()
share|improve this answer

I'm unsure what you mean by "in IDLE" vs "in CMD". A Python shell launched by IDLE should be able to be terminated the same way as a Python shell launched from the commandline.

Also, the tabs in your example appear to be wrong: everything below for... and above print... should be indented.

On to your question: are you asking for a command that terminates your script at that point? If so, adding the two lines from sys import exit and then calling exit() should do the trick, though it will raise a SystemExit exception. If you don't like that, you can add a pass handler for the SystemExit exception type at the outer layer of your program.

share|improve this answer
    
sometimes, commands in idle are different than in CMD (some things work in idle/cmd that doesn't work in the other.) –  astronautlevel Jul 3 '12 at 20:09
    
Huh. Like what? –  Zac B Jul 6 '12 at 17:25
    
just some import and similar commands –  astronautlevel Jul 6 '12 at 23:40

sys.exit can exit a program at any time.

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