Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to write a short Perl prg that has 1 parameter (a 3 digit integer) passed to it, and depending which list it's a member of it returns the corresponding list's number. How can I achieve this, also is there any way to put a range of number as an element in a list ?

 ::Returns 1,2,3,4 Depending on testNum passed
 @gp1= (829,845,851,859,864,867);
 @gp2= ("826-828","830-839","843-844","847-850","852-854","860-862","883");
 @gp3= ("855-858",861,"863","865");
 @gp4= ("877-882",884);

 if ( ($ARGV[0]>=822 && $ARGV[0] <=824) || $ARGV[0]  is membergp1)
 {  
  return 1
 }
  if ( $ARGV[0]>=826 && $ARGV[0]<=828 || $ARGV[0] is memebr of group2
    return 2
  if $ARGV[0] is memebr of group3
      return 3
  if $ARGV[0] is memebr of group4
      return 4
share|improve this question
    
I'd like something other than a for loop to test this. I don't know is there any build-in function that returns values if a variable is part of an array?? –  jerryh91 Jul 3 '12 at 20:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Three-digit numbers require an array of only one thousand elements. I suggest unpacking the data into an array and simply indexing that array with the passed parameter.

This program shows the idea. It expects the three-digit number on the command line.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @gp1=  qw(  829  845  851  859  864  867  );
my @gp2=  qw(  826-828  830-839  843-844  847-850  852-854  860-862  883  );
my @gp3=  qw(  855-858  861  863  865  );
my @gp4=  qw(  877-882  884  );

my @places;

my $n = 0;
for (\(@gp1, @gp2, @gp3, @gp4)) {
  $n++;
  for (@$_) {
    my @indices = /\d+/g;
    $places[$_] = $n for $indices[0] .. $indices[-1];
  }
}

my $val = $ARGV[0];
my $place = $places[$val];
printf "Value %s appears in %s\n", $val, $place ? "group $place" : "no group";

output

Value 832 appears in group 2

Update

Alternatively you could check whether the passed parameter matches each range as you process it.

The output is identical to the previous solution.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @gp1=  qw(  829  845  851  859  864  867  );
my @gp2=  qw(  826-828  830-839  843-844  847-850  852-854  860-862  883  );
my @gp3=  qw(  855-858  861  863  865  );
my @gp4=  qw(  877-882  884  );

my $val = $ARGV[0];

my $n = 0;
for (\(@gp1, @gp2, @gp3, @gp4)) {
  $n++;
  for (@$_) {
    my @indices = /\d+/g;
    if ($val >= $indices[0] and $val <= $indices[-1]) {
      printf "Value %s appears in group %d\n", $val, $n;
      exit;
    }
  }
}

printf "Value %s appears in no group\n", $val;
share|improve this answer

Put all the lists in range objects using Number::Range (has to be downloaded):

  use Number::Range;
  my $range= Number::Range->new("23..98,103..150");
       if ($range->inrange("110")) {
           print "In range\n";
       } else {
           print "Not in range\n";
       } 

See the following URL's:

http://forums.devshed.com/perl-programming-6/check-if-number-is-in-range-23-98t-574713.html https://metacpan.org/pod/Number::Range

share|improve this answer

Putting aside the issue of having ranges of numbers, a simple way to solve this problem is to make a hash of numbers and what group they're in.

my %num2group = (
    829 => 1,
    830 => 2,
    861 => 3,
    884 => 4,
    ...and so on...
);

Then you can simply query the hash to see what group (if any) a number is in.

my $group = $num2group{$number};

Rather than creating that hash by hand, you can generate it from your list of numbers.

$num2group{$_} = 1 for @grp1;
$num2group{$_} = 2 for @grp2;
...and so on...

This is where you'd handle ranges. While generating %num2group you'd expand any ranges out into individual hash entries. Assuming these ranges aren't enormous, this will make looking up groups efficient.

for my $num (@grp1) {
    if( /^(\d+)-(\d+)$/ ) {  # range
        $num2group{$_} = 1 for $1..$2;
    }
    else {
        $num2group{$num} = 1;
    }
}

Finally, rather than hard coding the group number, throw this into a subroutine.

sub add_to_group_hash {
    my($numbers, $group, $hash) = @_;

    for my $num (@$numbers) {
        if( /^(\d+)-(\d+)$/ ) {  # range
            $hash->{$_} = $group for $1..$2;
        }
        else {
            $hash->{$num} = $group;
        }
    }
 }

 add_to_group_hash(\@grp1, 1, \%num2group);
 add_to_group_hash(\@grp2, 2, \%num2group);
 ...and so on...

You can then add some error checking to make sure one number doesn't appear in two groups.

share|improve this answer

You probably will want to use a function from List::MoreUtils, such as any.

share|improve this answer

You can implement ranges using the range operator ..:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use feature 'say';

my @lists = (
             [829,845,851,859,864,867],
             [826 .. 828, 830 .. 839, 843 .. 844, 847 .. 850, 852 .. 854, 860 .. 862, 883],
             [855 .. 858, 861, 863, 865],
             [877 .. 882, 884]
            );

say join ' ',
         "In list(s):",
         grep { grep $_ == $ARGV[0], @{ $lists[$_ - 1] }} 1 .. @lists;
share|improve this answer

It is not a good idea to hard code the number of groups, or create a standalone array for each group.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use feature 'say';
use List::MoreUtils qw( first_index );

my @groups = (
    [829, 845, 851, 859, 864, 867 ],
    [
        826 .. 828,
        830 .. 839,
        843 .. 844,
        847 .. 850,
        852 .. 854,
        860 .. 862,
        883,
    ],
    [ 855 .. 858, 861, 863, 865 ],
    [ 877 .. 882, 884 ],
);

my ($candidate) = @ARGV;

my $group = first_index {
    (-1 < first_index { $candidate == $_ } @$_)
} @groups;

say $group > -1 ? $group : 'not found';
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.