Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following query:

SELECT child.id_catalog_category AS id_category, ancestor.id_catalog_category AS tree
FROM catalog_category AS child
JOIN catalog_category AS ancestor
ON (child.lft BETWEEN ancestor.lft AND ancestor.rgt)
WHERE ancestor.id_catalog_category != 1
ORDER BY id_category ASC, tree ASC

which is a reconstruction of a binary tree for a hierarchical product categories. For one id_category we could have a maximum of 4 "tree" values, as the example shows:

id_category / tree

3 2

3 3

4 2

4 3

4 4

5 2

5 3

5 5

6 2

6 3

6 6

7 2

7 3

7 7

Where the desired results should be :

id / id_category / tree

1 3 2

2 3 3

3 null null

4 null null

1 4 2

2 4 3

3 4 4

4 null null .....

In words, I want to add a range id from 1 to 4 for each id_category, where if id_category has less than 4 value it should show null values.

Regards

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To replicate the set of data you specified, I did this to get a working set:

CREATE TABLE cc (id_category INT, tree INT);
INSERT INTO cc VALUES (3,2),(3,3),(4,2),(4,3),(4,4),(5,2),(5,3),
                      (5,5),(6,2),(6,3),(6,6),(7,2),(7,3),(7,7);
SELECT cc.* FROM cc ORDER BY 1,2;

SQL Fiddle here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/16249/3


Here's how I would approach the problem. First, I would get a distinct list of id_category values. That's straightforward. (I Could use a DISTINCT keyword rather than GROUP BY, whichever.)

SELECT id_category
  FROM cc
 GROUP BY id_category
 ORDER BY id_category

Then, I would generate four rows from each of those rows. So, I'm going to wrap that previous query as an inline view (enclose it in a set of parenthesis, give it an alias, and reference the whole mess like it was just a tablename. Something like this:

SELECT c.id_category, j_.j
  FROM (SELECT 1 AS j UNION ALL SELECT 2 UNION ALL SELECT 3 UNION ALL SELECT 4) j_
  JOIN (
        SELECT cc.id_category
          FROM cc cc
         GROUP BY cc.id_category
         ORDER BY cc.id_category
       ) c
 ORDER BY c.id_category, j_.j

I'm using another inline view to return the integers 1 thru 4, and doing a CROSS JOIN to get four rows for each distinct id_category. That basically gets me the outline of the result set I want to return... but I don't have any values (other than NULL) for the tree column.

So now, I need to backup, and start working on another rowset, basically an ordered set from the cc table, but this time, including the value from the tree column. I'm not concerned here with getting exactly four rows, just the rows that have a value in the tree column. Again, very straightforward:

SELECT s.id_category_id, s.tree
  FROM cc s
 ORDER BY s.id_category, s.tree

But now, I want to assign each of those rows a relative row number, within each id_category. I can do by wrapping that query in a set of parenthesis, giving it an alias, and treating it like it were a table, like this:

SELECT @i := IF(r.id_category = @prev_idcat,@i + 1,1) AS i
     , @prev_idcat := r.id_category AS id_category
     , r.tree
  FROM (SELECT @i := 0, @prev_idcat := NULL) i_ 
  JOIN (
        SELECT s.id_category, s.tree
          FROM cc s
         ORDER BY s.id_category, s.tree
       ) r

I'm using a MySQL trick with user variables, to assign ascending integer values, starting at 1, for each distinct id_category. The trick here is to have MySQL order the rows for me (in the inline view aliased as r, and "saving" the id_category from the previous row in a user variable, so I can compare it to the next row.

And now we're really getting to the point where having Common Table Expressions available in MySQL would be really, really nice. But since they aren't, we press forward, nesting our inline views.

So I'm going to give each of those "row numbering" queries an alias, and reference them like they were tables; The query is going to be of the form...

SELECT b.*, q.*
  FROM ( ) b
  LEFT
  JOIN ( ) q
    ON q.id_category = b.id_category AND q.i = b.j

(We omit the contents of those inline views just to get an overview of what the statement is really doing.)

This is going to start looking ugly, but this is where the magic happens. I pull the four rows for each id_category from b, and I join that to q, matching on id_category and on "row number". It's a LEFT OUTER join, so I'm going to get all the rows from b, and pick up any "matching" row from q.

SELECT b.id_category, q.tree
  FROM (SELECT c.id_category, j_.j
          FROM (SELECT 1 AS j UNION ALL SELECT 2 UNION ALL SELECT 3 UNION ALL SELECT 4
               ) j_
          JOIN (
                SELECT cc.id_category
                  FROM cc cc
                 GROUP BY cc.id_category
                 ORDER BY cc.id_category
               ) c
         ORDER BY c.id_category, j_.j
       ) b   
  LEFT 
  JOIN (SELECT @i := IF(r.id_category = @prev_idcat,@i + 1,1) AS i
             , @prev_idcat := r.id_category AS id_category
             , r.tree
          FROM (SELECT @i := 0, @prev_idcat := NULL) i_ 
          JOIN (
                SELECT s.id_category, s.tree
                  FROM cc s
                 ORDER BY s.id_category, s.tree
               ) r
       ) q
    ON q.id_category = b.id_category AND q.i = b.j
 ORDER BY b.id_category, b.j

The only thing remaining in the specification is the generation of a value for an id column. If I was inserting to a table, I could use an AUTO_INCREMENT column to do it for me. But absent that, the most convenient place for me to generate an id value is in the inline view aliased as b. Just a little tweak, and finally, we have this monstrosity of a query, which returns the specified result set:


SELECT b.k AS id, b.id_category, q.tree
  FROM (SELECT @k := @k + 1 AS k
             , c.id_category
             , j_.j
          FROM (SELECT @k := 0) k_
          JOIN (SELECT 1 AS j UNION ALL SELECT 2 UNION ALL SELECT 3 UNION ALL SELECT 4
               ) j_ 
          JOIN (
                SELECT cc.id_category
                  FROM cc cc
                 GROUP BY cc.id_category
                 ORDER BY cc.id_category
               ) c
         ORDER BY c.id_category, j_.j
       ) b
  LEFT
  JOIN (SELECT @i := IF(r.id_category = @prev_idcat,@i + 1,1) AS i
             , @prev_idcat := r.id_category AS id_category
             , r.tree
          FROM (SELECT @i := 0, @prev_idcat := NULL) i_ 
          JOIN (
                SELECT s.id_category, s.tree
                 FROM cc s
                 ORDER BY s.id_category, s.tree
               ) r
       ) q
    ON q.id_category = b.id_category AND q.i = b.j 
 ORDER BY b.id_category, b.j

To get this to work with your rowset, you would replace each reference to my cc table with your query wrapped in parenthesis. Or, you could create a table named cc like I have done, and insert the results of your query into it.

Someone may have a simpler SQL statement that reliably produces the same result set. I'd be very interested to learn a simpler way.

share|improve this answer
    
awesome! just what I needed. thx ;) –  Cristobal Sep 3 '12 at 18:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.