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I have an interface and a class defined in separate assemblies, like this:

namespace DataInterfaces
{
    public interface IPerson
    {
        string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

namespace DataObjects
{
    [DataContract]
    [KnownType( typeof( IPerson ) ) ]
    public class Person : IPerson
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

This is my Service Interface:

public interface ICalculator
{
    [OperationContract]
    IPerson GetPerson ( );
}

When I update my Service Reference for my Client, I get this in the Reference.cs:

public object GetPerson() {
    return base.Channel.GetPerson();

I was hoping that KnownType would give me IPerson instead of "object" here.

I have also tried [KnownType( typeof( Person ) ) ] with the same result. I have control of both client and server, so I have my DataObjects (where Person is defined) and DataInterfaces (where IPerson is defined) assemblies in both places. Is there something obvious I am missing? I thought KnownType was the answer to being able to use interfaces with WCF.

----- FURTHER INFORMATION ----- I removed the KnownType from the Person class and added

[ServiceKnownType( typeof( Person ) ) ]

to my service interface, as suggested by Richard. The client-side proxy still looks the same,

public object GetPerson() { return base.Channel.GetPerson();

, but now it doesn't blow up. The client just has an "object", though, so it has to cast it to IPerson before it is useful.

        var person = client.GetPerson ( );
        Console.WriteLine ( ( ( IPerson ) person ).Name );
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3 Answers

If you need [ServiceKnownType] on the service contract then the IPerson assembly does not need knowledge of the Person assembly.

[ServiceKnownType(typeof(Person))]
public interface ICalculator
{
    [OperationContract]
    IPerson GetPerson ( );
}

Alternatively you could use the version of the KnownType constructor that takes a method name. This could then find the known types from, say, the config file

However, I don't understand why you are using interfaces on your contract. The contract is the definition of the messages that are being passed around - how are interfaces helping in this situation?

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I'm sorry I don't understand your first statement, I'll check it out. With regard to your question about how interfaces help, I have a data access layer that used to be SubSonic, now it is EntityFramework. In anticipation of just such a change, we had abstracted away the data access layer so that all it delivers is Interface types. (Is that uncommon?) Therefore, when the service is working with a data object, it has the interface type, not the concrete. I thought I understood that, since the serialization has to have a concrete to work with, KnownType was the workaround. –  Kelly Cline Jul 3 '12 at 23:06
    
I added [ServiceKnownType( typeof( IPerson ) )] above my ServiceContract, and I now see public DataObjects.Person GetPerson()... in my reference.cs. That is better. Can I get it to be IPerson there? –  Kelly Cline Jul 3 '12 at 23:12
    
Agree with Richard's comment regarding interfaces. Generally the concept maps poorly into the message passing world of XML web services on which WCF is based. WSDL, XSD and XML do not have an equivalent concept. As soon as you start using these KnownType attributes, you can pretty well rule out interoperability of these web services with non .Net platforms. –  Phil Degenhardt Jul 3 '12 at 23:36
    
You should not be using your business abstractions on the service boundary. You should use dedicated DTOs that describe the data you want to send in the way you want to send it. You can use a mapper such as AutoMapper to bridge the types. Using your business abstraction prevents you from changing your domain objects without potentially breakung the consumers of your service –  Richard Blewett Jul 4 '12 at 8:20
    
I added the intended usage of ServiceKnownType –  Richard Blewett Jul 4 '12 at 8:35
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You need to put the KnownType on IPerson not on Person like this:

[KnownType(typeof(Person))]
public interface IPerson
{
    string Name { get; set; }
}
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I hope that's not the answer :) because it means I can't have separate DataObjects and DataInterfaces, because this makes for a circular reference. Person : IPerson vs. KnownType Person for IPerson... I thought I'd try it anyway, but I get a compile error saying KnownType can only be used for class, struct... –  Kelly Cline Jul 3 '12 at 22:44
    
Yes they would need to go into the same assembly. Alternatively, if your base was a class rather than an interface, you could provide the known types via a static method on the base class [KnownType(MethodName=...)]. Or you could provide the known types directly to the serializer rather than relying on it to discover them via attributes or static method. –  Phil Degenhardt Jul 3 '12 at 22:56
    
I'm really trying to keep those assemblies separate, but I appreciate the alternatives - good food for thought. –  Kelly Cline Jul 3 '12 at 23:18
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The whole idea of inheritance is that the base class has no knowledge of specialized classes. Decorating a data contract base class (usually defined in a common dll) with specialised types seems to break basic OOD principles? IMHO SvcUtil should do this leg work for you and use known types when it generates the proxy. It seems as if basic OO was not even considered when the svcutil was developed.

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