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I've looked around a bit and haven't found an answer to this yet.

I have an ajax request that when you click the button it sends info to the server and hides the current div and loads a loading gif. I have it set so when the server responds it gets rid of loading gif and shows the content from the server.

code:

$("#submit").click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    var $domain = $.fn.HTTP($('#domain').val());
    if(!$.fn.ValidURL($domain)){
      $('#domainerror').fadeIn(500);
      return false;
    } 

    if($('#domainerror').css('display')!=='none'){
      $('#domainerror').fadeOut(350);
    }

    $('#question').hide(500, function(){
        $('#waiting').show(350);
    });

    $.getJSON('http://localhost/file.php',
    {
        i: $domain
    },
      function(data){
        $('#answer').html(data.message + $('#trybutton').html());
        $('#waiting').hide(350, function(){
          $('#answer').show(350);
        });
    });
});

The problem is jQuery receives the response from the server too fast and the loading gif doesn't disappear.

However if I tell the server to sleep for 3 seconds it works just fine. This is not the solution I want.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
"However if I tell the server to sleep for 3 seconds it works just fine" That sounds like the solution right there –  Paul Dessert Jul 3 '12 at 22:21
1  
Edited my question. That's not the solution I want. If it can be instant then fine. I'm trying to optimize for people on mobile connections so a loading bar very well may be necessary. I don't purposefully want to make a user have to wait 3 seconds for an answer. –  Peter Jul 3 '12 at 22:24
1  
If the response comes back right away, what's the problem? Why do you need to show the "loading" image if the user's not waiting very long? –  Pointy Jul 3 '12 at 22:24
    
don't use an animation to show the waiting animation, instead make it show() without the time argument –  Pablo Mescher Jul 3 '12 at 22:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Surely it's a good thing your users aren't having to see a loading animation because it's so fast?!

Anyway, the problem is that the animation is taking at least 500ms - animations are processed asynchronously, at the same time as your AJAX request. Instead of making the server sleep, which is arguably a waste of CPU, make the browser wait instead, before you send the AJAX request.

Put the call in a setTimeout() function, this example will make it wait 3 seconds:

setTimeout(function() {
    $.getJSON('http://localhost/file.php',
    {
        i: $domain
    },
    function(data){
        $('#answer').html(data.message + $('#trybutton').html());
        $('#waiting').hide(350, function(){
            $('#answer').show(350);
        });
    });
}, 3000);

The ideal solution however would be to not use animation effects and just use show() and hide().

share|improve this answer
    
Waiting 3s before sending the request is also a waste of time. –  Bergi Jul 3 '12 at 22:36
    
Very true, if you really want a transition effect here you'd only really need to wait 500ms as that's the time before the first fadeIn animation completes. Even so, the fadeOuts could be changed to hides and then you wouldn't need a delay at all. –  greg84 Jul 3 '12 at 22:38

Get rid of the delay in showing the waiting animation, so it's not still showing up when the request returned.

 $('#question').hide() //was 500
 $('#waiting').show(); //was 350

If you add all up that's almost a second later. By that time the ajax request may have returned in most systems, so it's not worth to be still animating by that point

share|improve this answer

Use Javascript's setTimeout. Code may look something (perhaps not exactly) like this:

setTimeout("getResponse()", 3000);

function getResponse() {
    $.getJSON('http://localhost/file.php',
    {
        i: $domain
    },
      function(data){
        $('#answer').html(data.message + $('#trybutton').html());
        $('#waiting').hide(350, function(){
          $('#answer').show(350);
        });
    });
}

That way you've got your AJAX request still sending your i variable to the server, processing the code in file.php and sending back data which you can handle. The only trick is to put this in a function (not required, but it certainly makes the setTimeout function look prettier) and call it after 3000 milliseconds.

share|improve this answer
    
This won't work, learn about setTimeout here. Also, waiting 3s is only a waste of time. –  Bergi Jul 4 '12 at 0:07
    
Bergi - Thanks for teaching me about setTimeout. The question asked how to delay code for three seconds. I agree this isn't what should be done, but I provided an answer which would do just that. –  cereallarceny Jul 4 '12 at 0:15
    
I don't think he asked for a waiting script instead of a waiting server. He just attested that it's a timing issue. –  Bergi Jul 4 '12 at 10:09

Seems like the ajax callback is executed before the question hiding ends, and the $('#waiting').show(350); comes after $('#waiting').hide(350, ...). You have three possibilities to solve that:

If you'd show the #waiting img immidiately (not waiting for the question to fade out), this won't happen; the answer should then also not wait for #waiting to hide.


Or you use a variable to indicate that the answer is already fading in when the question has faded out, and show no animation then:

var answered = false,
    waiting = false;
$('#question').hide(500, function(){
    if (!answered) {
        waiting = true;
        $('#waiting').show(350);
    }
});

$.getJSON('http://localhost/file.php', {
    i: $domain
}, function(data){
    $('#answer').html(data.message + $('#trybutton').html());
    answered = true;
    if (waiting) {
        $('#waiting').stop().hide(350, function(){
            $('#answer').show(350);
        });
    } else {
        $('#answer').show(350);
    }
});

If you want the four animations to show always and consecutively (at least 1550ms), you'd need to code them manually:

var showanswer = false;
$('#question').hide(500, function() {
    $('#waiting').show(350, function() {
        if (showanswer) // already loaded
           showanswer(); // execute callback
        else
           showanswer = true; // mark as shown
    });
});

$.getJSON('http://localhost/file.php', {
    i: $domain
}, function(data){
    $('#answer').html(data.message + $('#trybutton').html());
    function animate() {
        $('#waiting').hide(350, function(){
            $('#answer').show(350);
        });
    }
    if (showanswer) // waiting image shown
        animate();
    else
        showanswer = animate; // set as callback
});
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