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I have a working bit of code here where I am comparing the keys of six hashes together to find the ones that are common amongst all of them. I then combine the values from each hash into one value in a new hash. What I would like to do is make this scaleable. I would like to be able to easily go from comparing 3 hashes to 100 without having to go back into my code and altering it. Any thoughts on how I would achieve this? The rest of the code already works well for different input amounts, but this is the one part that has me stuck.

my $comparison = List::Compare->new([keys %{$posHashes[0]}], [keys %{$posHashes[1]}], [keys %{$posHashes[2]}], [keys %{$posHashes[3]}], [keys %{$posHashes[4]}], [keys %{$posHashes[5]}]);
my %comboHash;
for ($comparison->get_intersection) {
$comboHash{$_} = ($posHashes[0]{$_} . $posHashes[1]{$_} . $posHashes[2]{$_} . $posHashes[3]{$_} . $posHashes[4]{$_} . $posHashes[5]{$_});
}
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Just create a subroutine and pass hash references to it, then you can easily do the necessary looping inside it. E.g. my @hashes = @_; for my $href (@hashes) { ... }. –  TLP Jul 3 '12 at 23:05

4 Answers 4

There is pretty straightforward solution:

sub merge {
    my $first = shift;
    my @hashes = @_;
    my %result;
    KEY:
    for my $key (keys %$first) {
        my $accu = $first->{$key};
        for my $hash (@hashes) {
            next KEY unless exists $hash->{$key};
            $accu .= $hash->{$key};
        }
        $result{$key} = $accu;
    }
    return \%result;
}

You have to call it with references to hashes and it will return also hash reference e.g.:

my $comboHashRef = merge(@posHashes);
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Create a subroutine:

sub combine_hashes {
  my %result = ();
  my @hashes = @_;
  my $first = shift @hashes;
  for my $element (keys %$first) {
    my $count = 0;
    for my $href (@hashes) {
      $count += (grep {$_ eq $element} (keys %$href));
    }
    if ($count > $#hashes) {
      $result{$element} = $first->{$element};
      $result{$element} .= $_->{$element} for @hashes;
    }
  }
  \%result;
}

and call it by:

my %h = %{combine_hashes(\%h1, \%h2, \%h3)};

...or as:

my %h = %{combine_hashes(@posHashes)};
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my %all;
for my $posHash (@posHashes) {
   for my $key (keys(%$posHash)) {
      push @{ $all{$key} }, $posHash->{$key};
   }
}

my %comboHash;
for my $key (keys(%all)) {
   next if @{ $all{$key} } != @posHashes;
   $comboHash{$key} = join('', @{ $all{$key} });
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's not clear what "I am comparing the keys of six hashes together to find the ones that are common amongst all of them" means. I took it to mean you're looking for keys common to all the hashes. If it means you want to compare the values at those keys, you just need to change the next line. –  ikegami Jul 3 '12 at 23:29

Just make a subroutine and pass it hash references

my $combination = combine(@posHashes);

sub combine {
    my @hashes = @_;
    my @keys;
    for my $href (@hashes) {
        push @keys, keys %$href;
    }
    # Insert intersection code here..
    # .....
    my %combo;
    for my $href (@hashes) {
        for my $key (@intersection) {
            $combo{$key} .= $href->{$key};
        }
    }
    return \%combo;
}
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