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Are “div > p” & “div p” same?

Here's the page i'm using as a reference for CSS, please note that i only started learning HTML/CSS this morning.

I'm confused about two of the selectors, quoting the site, the "div p" selector selects all <p> elements inside <div> elements, and the "div > p" selector selects all <p> elements where the parent is a <div> element.

What is the difference between those two? Examples where these two selectors can't be used interchangably would be helpful, if possible.

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marked as duplicate by BoltClock Jul 4 '12 at 4:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
w3fools.com But in any case, the > means directly a descendant of. –  TheZ Jul 3 '12 at 23:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

div > p selects only the <p> elements that are immediate children of a <div>.

So:

div > p

will select this paragraph:

<div>
    <p>This is a paragraph</p>
</div>

but will not select this paragraph:

<div>
    <table>
        <tr>
            <td>
                <p>This will not get selected</p>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>
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7  
Actually, your second example will still get selected, because it is still a <p> directly within a <div> –  VictorKilo Jul 3 '12 at 23:42
    
haha, whoops. Fixing that. –  andyzinsser Jul 3 '12 at 23:42
    
Welp, that should do the trick... :) –  VictorKilo Jul 3 '12 at 23:45
    
also you ended your <table> with a </div>, i'm gonna take this answer, because it's the simplest nad still satisfies the question fully –  dreta Jul 3 '12 at 23:51
    
Looks like a revision history problem with so many people editing at the same time. #bug –  andyzinsser Jul 3 '12 at 23:55

Selecting all p tags inside of a div means ALL p tags inside of a div... where as the second means the p tags that are just one level below a div.

From The 30 CSS Selectors you Must Memorize #8:

The difference between the standard X Y and X > Y is that the latter will only select direct children. For example, consider the following markup.

Consider this example:

HTML

<div class="one">
  <p>asdf</p>
  <div>
    <p>asdf</p>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="two">
  <p>asdf</p>
  <div>
    <p>asdf</p>
  </div>
</div>

CSS

div.one p {
  margin: 20px;
  background-color:#F00;
}

div.two > p {
  margin: 20px;
  background-color:#0F0;
}

In the first one, both p tags will be colored red (#F00) because it selects all p tags within the div. In the second, only the first p tag will be blue (#0F0) because it only selects direct descendants.

DEMO

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I thoroughly approve –  watson Jul 3 '12 at 23:40
    
that site you used for the demo's really usefull –  dreta Jul 3 '12 at 23:49

div p is the descendant selector, it will match any p elements which have a div higher in their hierarchy. div > p, which uses the child selector, will only match p elements whose direct parent is a div.

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.html#pattern-matching

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Case 1: "div p" implies All the <p>'s will be selected

<div>
  <p id=1> 
    <p id=2>
      <p id=3></p>
    </p>
  </p>
</div>

Case 2: "div > p" only <p id=1> will be selected i.e. all p tags with div as the immediate parent

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This is a weird example - you should probably make your example HTML at least mostly valid. –  Beejamin Jul 3 '12 at 23:43

div p will match any p with an ancestor div, which need not be its parent. So all these match:

<div><p>Matches</p></div>
<div><form><p>Matches</p></form></div>
<div><section><blockquote><p>Matches</p></blockquote></section></div>

div > p will only match a p with a direct parent div. Like this:

<div><p>Matches</p></div>

(You will note that everything matched by div > p is also matched by div p.)

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