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Was trying to keep this simple but I think I've complicated the regex now:

Basically, I want to remove all digits from a string - but taking into consideration that there may be a comma sign or a decimal.

Examples:

$13 -> 13
$13.95 -> 13
$1,300 -> 1300
$ 13 -> 13
Only 3 left -> 3
34 sold -> 34
34% -> 34
(45%) -> 45
($14) -> 14
£13 -> 13 (unicode u00A3)

Current regex in python:

re.match(ur"\$?\u00A3?(?:\s+)?((\d+)\,?(\d+)?)\%?(?:\.[0-9]*)?", value)
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Check out this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/10872639/… –  nhahtdh Jul 4 '12 at 2:04
3  
why does $13.95 -> 13 ? –  wim Jul 4 '12 at 2:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What about a non-regex based solution?

>>> s = '$1,300'
>>> ''.join([x for x in s if x.isdigit()])
'1300'

This should work for all of your examples, except for $13.95 -> 13 which I need clarification on the reasoning. If you need to recognise negative numbers, floats, scientific notation etc you would have to tweak it.

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This was the problem I was having upon which I found my self heading down the road to complexity. In some cases the data will be imported such as $13.95, in which I only need the whole number. I was thinking - check for the presence of a "." and if it exists extract only the digits before it. –  AlexZ Jul 4 '12 at 2:14
    
Note that some countries use a decimal , instead of a .. How will you tell the difference between $15,000 and $1,50 ? –  wim Jul 4 '12 at 2:16
    
Hmm, It'd be rare to see $1,50 -> $150, so I guess if there are only two digits after the , then it is a float, in most cases comma is used for $1,500 $10,000 etc. –  AlexZ Jul 4 '12 at 2:22

Works for every case. Used some lookbehind for the . thing

>>> u''.join(re.findall(ur'(?<!\.|\d)(\d+)', '$13.95'))
'13'
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This regex should match everything perfectly:

'\$?([0-9,]+)[.%]?'

Literal meaning:

  • Can have a dollar sign
  • grab all numbers and commas [0-9,] that are there.
  • stop if theres no more numbers, a . or a % appears.
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Thanks - How would I append/prepend other prefixes such as pound, euro etc –  AlexZ Jul 4 '12 at 2:26
    
I'm not sure where some country's currencies are meant go (before/after), but replace the currency symbol where i put @@@ in this: '\@@@?([0-9,]+)[.%@@@]?'. Just means it can be $32 or 32$, for example, if you used $ in both places. –  jared Jul 4 '12 at 2:32
    
I think euro is after –  AlexZ Jul 4 '12 at 2:39
    
This does not work when it is in () i.e ($44) –  AlexZ Jul 4 '12 at 2:42
    
get rid of the '' around it. should run as function(\$?([0-9,]+)[.%]?). I tested using pythonregex.com –  jared Jul 4 '12 at 2:47

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