Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a method:

	public void StoreUsingKey<T>(T value) where T : class, new() {
		var idModel = value as IIDModel;
		if (idModel != null)
			Store<T>(idModel);

		AddToCacheUsingKey(value);
	}

that I would like to optionally call the following method, based on the value parameter's implementation of IIDModel.

	public void Store<T>(T value) where T : class, IIDModel, new() {
		AddModelToCache(value);
	}

Is there a way to tell Store<T> that the value parameter from StoreUsingKey<T> implements IIDModel? Or am I going about this the wrong way?

Rich

Answer

Removing the new() constraint from each method allows the code to work. The problem was down to me trying to pass off an interface as an object which can be instantiated.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

You already are. By putting the IIDModel constraint on the Store<T> method, you're guaranteeing, that the value parameter implements IIDModel.

Oh, ok I see what you're saying now. How about this:

public void StoreUsingKey<T>(T value) where T : class, new() {
                if (idModel is IIDModel)
                        Store<T>((IIDModel)idModel);

                AddToCacheUsingKey(value);
        }

Edit yet again: Tinister is right. This by itself won't do the trick. However, if your Store method looks like what Joel Coehoorn posted, then it should work.

share|improve this answer
    
But the StoreUsingKey<T> method doesn't have this constraint. How do I selectively call Store<T>? The example above errors with "cannot convert from 'IIDModel' to 'T'". –  kim3er Jul 15 '09 at 15:43
    
This doesn't seem to work: 'IIDModel' must be a non-abstract type with a public parameterless constructor in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'Store<T>(T)' –  Tinister Jul 15 '09 at 16:33
    
Sorted it, the class constraints were red herrings. I was being overly restrictive. By removing the class constraint from both methods, the code starts working. Thanks for your help. –  kim3er Jul 15 '09 at 20:23
    
By "class", I mean "new()". –  kim3er Jul 15 '09 at 20:36
add comment
public void Store(IIDModel value) {
    AddModelToCache(value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I should have been more explicit. The AddModelToCache method is also generic in nature. –  kim3er Jul 15 '09 at 20:25
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Removing the new() constraint from each method allows the code to work. The problem was down to me trying to pass off an interface as an object which can be instantiated.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.