Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I determine the dimensionality of a list programmatically? Thanks.

share|improve this question
5  
Lists are always one-dimensional. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 4 '12 at 3:30
4  
Lists are not arrays: the entries in a (nested) list don't have to be the same structure. [a, [b,c]] is a legal list, but doesn't really have a dimensionality. –  Andrew Jaffe Jul 4 '12 at 3:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming uniformity:

dims = []
while isinstance(matrix, list) and matrix is not None:
    dims.append(len(matrix))
    matrix = matrix[0]
number_of_dimensions = len(dims)

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it works perfectly. –  Sti HK Jul 4 '12 at 3:38
1  
Happy to help. If you like an answer, consider upvoting/accepting –  inspectorG4dget Jul 4 '12 at 3:39
    
What's the point of and matrix is not None? –  georg Jul 4 '12 at 6:59
    
Sorry about the delay - went to watch the new Spiderman movie. Just got back to my desk at work. Depending on the version of python, None objects can be of every type. isinstance(None, list) returns True in some versions. I wrote this code to be version independent. It should work with python 2.x (can't be sure about 3.x) –  inspectorG4dget Jul 4 '12 at 8:17

For a straightforward list, you can get its length with len:

>>> l = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> len(l)
5

For matrices, which are most easily represented as nested lists, you can get the length of the first sub-list, e.g.:

>>> matrix = [
    [1, 2],
    [3, 4],
    [5, 6],
    [7, 8],
    [9, 10]]
>>> len(matrix)
5
>>> len(matrix[0])
2

Taking into account JBernardo's comment, define a simple iterable helper:

>>> def iterable(x):
    if isinstance(x, basestring): return False
    try:
        iter(x)
    except TypeError:
        return False
    return True

>>> iterable(4)
False
>>> iterable([1, 2, 3])
True

Then we can recursively define the dimensionality function:

>>> def dimensionality(l):
    if not iterable(l): return 0
    return 1 + dimensionality(l[0])

>>> dimensionality(0)
0
>>> dimensionality([1, 2, 3])
1
>>> dimensionality([[1,2], [2,3], [3,4]])
2
>>> dimensionality([[[1,2],[2,3]], [[2,3],[3,4]], [[3,4],[4,5]]])
3

Instead of iterable you could do isinstance(x, list) or whatever other check you want. Edited to exclude strings to avoid dimensionality('lol') infinite loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
Maybe OP meant the number of dimensions. –  JBernardo Jul 4 '12 at 3:30
2  
dimensionality('lol') -> infinite loop. Make sure to exclude strings. –  JBernardo Jul 4 '12 at 3:36
    
@JBernardo: good point, ty –  Claudiu Jul 4 '12 at 3:38
    
Thanks, it works! –  Sti HK Jul 4 '12 at 3:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.