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A question was asked to me today and I do not believe it is possible, but I could be wrong or am over thinking it. How can you reverse an array without using iteration in C?

My thought is that it's impossible because of the fact that the array can be any size and that no C program can be expressed with that kind of support in mind without using some form of iteration.

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Was this a classroom question? Interview question? General puzzle question? –  reuben Jul 4 '12 at 4:44
2  
Maybe use recursion instead? –  Niklas R Jul 4 '12 at 4:44
    
An example is probably a good idea: { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 } turns into { 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 } in memory. –  Michael J. Gray Jul 4 '12 at 4:44
1  
+1. It may be impossible. But we need some proof or a group of people to confirm whether its possible or not. :) –  madhairsilence Jul 4 '12 at 4:50
6  
This will mostly comes down to definitions, like exactly what does/doesn't fall within "iteration". –  Jerry Coffin Jul 4 '12 at 4:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 66 down vote accepted

The answer to your question is that, yes, it is possible to reverse an array without iteration. The phrasing of the question itself might be ambiguous, however, the spirit of the question is obvious: a recursive algorithm can be used; and there is no ambiguity at all as to the meaning of recursive in this sense.

If, in an interview situation with a top-flight company, you were asked this question, then the following pseudo-code would be sufficient to demonstrate you truly understood what is meant by recursion:

function reverse(array)

    if (length(array) < 2) then
        return array

    left_half = reverse(array[0 .. (n/2)-1])
    right_half = reverse(array[(n/2) .. (n-1)])

    return right_half + left_half

end

For example, if we have an array of 16 elements containing the first 16 letters of the Latin Alphabet, [A]..[P], the above reverse algorithm could be visualised as follows:

                   Original Input

1.                ABCDEFHGIJKLMNOP                   Recurse
2.        ABCDEFGH                IJKLMNOP           Recurse
3.    ABCD        EFGH        IJKL        MNOP       Recurse
4.  AB    CD    EF    GH    IJ    KL    MN    OP     Recurse

5. A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P    Terminate

6.  BA    DC    FE    HG    JI    LK    NM    PO     Reverse
7.    DCBA        HGFE        LKJI        PONM       Reverse
8.        HGFEDCBA                PONMLKJI           Reverse
9.                PONMLKJIHGFEDCBA                   Reverse

                  Reversed Output

Any problem that is solved with a recursive algorithm follows the Divide and Conquer paradigm, namely that:

  1. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is smaller than, but can be solved in a similar manner to, the original problem (Divide).

  2. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is independent and can be solved either recursively, or in a straightforward manner if small enough (Conquer).

  3. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where the results of those sub-problems are combined to give the solution for the original problem (Combine).

The pseudo-code above for reversing an array strictly satisfies the above criteria. Thus, it can be considered a recursive algorithm and we can state without any doubt that reversing an array can be done without using iteration.


ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND INFORMATION
The difference between Iteration, Recursive Implementations and Recursive Algorithms

It is a common misunderstanding that a recursive implementation means an algorithm is recursive. They are not equivalent. Here is a definitive explanation as to why, including a detailed explanation of the above solution.



What are Iteration and Recursion?

Back in 1990, three of the most respected scholars of modern algorithm analysis in the field of computer science, Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson and Ronald L. Rivest, released their much acclaimed Introduction to Algorithms. In this book, which represented the coming together of over 200 respected texts in their own right, and which for over 20 years has been used as the first and only text for teaching algorithms in most of the top-flight universities around the world, Mssrs. Cormen, Leiserson, and Rivest were explicit about what constitutes Iterating and what constitutes Recursing.

In their analysis and comparison of two classic sorting algorithms, Insertion Sort and Merge Sort, they explain the fundamental properties of iterative and recursive algorithms (sometimes termed incremental algorithms to disambiguate when the classical mathematical notion of iteration is being used in the same context).

Firstly, Insertion Sort is classified as an Iterative algorithm, with its behaviour summarised as follows:

Having sorted the subarray A[1..j-1], we insert the single item A[j] into its proper place, yielding the sorted array A[1..j].

Source: Introduction to Algorithms - Cormen, Leisersen, Rivest, 1990 MIT Press

This statement classifies an Iterative algorithm as one that relies on the result or state of a previous execution ("iteration") of the algorithm, and that such results or state information are then used to solve the problem for the current iteration.

Merge Sort, on the other hand, is classified as a recursive algorithm. A recursive algorithm conforms to a processing paradigm called Divide and Conquer which is a set of three fundamental criteria that differentiate the operation of recursive algorithms from non-recursive algorithms. An algorithm can be considered recursive if, during the processing of a given problem:

  1. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is smaller than, but can be solved in a similar manner to, the original problem (Divide).

  2. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem can be solved either recursively, or in a straightforward manner if small enough (Conquer).

  3. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where the results of those sub-problems are combined to give the solution for the original problem (Combine).

Reference: Introduction to Algorithms - Cormen, Leisersen, Rivest, 1990 MIT Press

Both Iterative algorithms and Recursive algorithms continue their work until a terminating condition has been reached. The terminating condition in Insertion Sort is that the j'th item has been properly placed in the array A[1..j]. The terminating condition in a Divide and Conquer algorithm is when Criteria 2 of the paradigm "bottoms out", that is, the size of a sub-problem reaches a sufficiently small size that it can be solved without further sub-division.

It's important to note that the Divide and Conquer paradigm requires that sub-problems must be solvable in a similar manner to the original problem to allow recursion. As the original problem is a standalone problem, with no outside dependencies, it follows that the sub-problems must also be solvable as if they were standalone problems with no outside dependencies, particularly on other sub-problems. This means that sub-problems in Divide and Conquer algorithms should be naturally independent.

Conversely, it is equally important to note that input to iterative algorithms is based on previous iterations of the algorithm, and so must be considered and processed in order. This creates dependencies between iterations which prevent the algorithm dividing the problem into sub-problems that can be recursively solved. In Insertion Sort, for example, you cannot divide the items A[1..j] into two sub-sets such that the sorted position in the array of A[j] gets decided before all items A[1..j-1] have been placed, as the real proper position of A[j] may move while any of A[1..j-1] are being themselves placed.

Recursive Algorithms vs. Recursive Implementations

The general misunderstanding of the term recursion stems from the fact there is a common and wrong assumption that a recursive implementation for some task automatically means that the problem has been solved with a recursive algorithm. Recursive algorithms are not the same as recursive implementations and never have been.

A recursive implementation involves a function, or group of functions, that eventually call themselves in order to solve a sub-portion of the overall task in exactly the same manner that the overall task is being solved in. It happens that recursive algorithms (i.e, those that satisfy the Divide and Conquer paradigm), lend themselves well to recursive implementations. However, recursive algorithms can be implemented using just iterative constructs like for(...) and while(...) as all algorithms, including recursive algorithms, end up performing some task repeatedly in order to get a result.

Other contributors to this post have demonstrated perfectly that iterative algorithms can be implemented using a recursive function. In fact, recursive implementations are possible for everything that involves iterating until some terminating condition has been met. Recursive implementations where there is no Divide or Combine steps in the underlying algorithm are equivalent to iterative implementations with a standard terminating condition.

Taking Insertion Sort as an example, we already know (and it has been proven) that Insertion Sort is an iterative algorithm. However, this does not prevent a recursive implementation of Insertion Sort. In fact, a recursive implementation can be created very easily as follows:

function insertionSort(array)

    if (length(array) == 1)
        return array
    end

    itemToSort = array[length(array)]
    array = insertionSort(array[1 .. (length(array)-1)])

    find position of itemToSort in array
    insert itemToSort into array

    return array

end

As can be seen, the implementation is recursive. However, Insertion Sort is an iterative algorithm and this we know. So, how do we know that even by using the above recursive implementation that our Insertion Sort algorithm hasn't become recursive? Let us apply the three criteria of the Divide and Conquer paradigm to our algorithm and check.

  1. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is smaller than, but can be solved in a similar manner to, the original problem.

    YES: Excluding an array of length one, the method for inserting an item A[j] into its proper place in the array is identical to the method used to insert all previous items A[1..j-1] into the array.

  2. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is independent and can be solved either recursively, or in a straightforward manner if small enough.

    NO: Proper placement of item A[j] is wholly dependent on the array containing A[1..j-1] items and those items being sorted. Therefore, item A[j] (called itemToSort) is not put in the array before the rest of the array is processed.

  3. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where the results of those sub-problems are combined to give the solution for the original problem.

    NO: Being an iterative algorithm, only one item A[j] can be properly placed in any given iteration. The space A[1..j] is not divided into sub-problems where A[1], A[2]...A[j] are all properly placed independently and then all these properly placed elements combined to give the sorted array.

Clearly, our recursive implementation has not made the Insertion Sort algorithm recursive in nature. In fact, the recursion in the implementation in this case is acting as flow control, allowing the iteration to continue until the terminating condition has been met. Therefore, using a recursive implementation did not change our algorithm into a recursive algorithm.

Reversing an Array Without Using an Iterative Algorithm

So now that we understand what makes an algorithm iterative, and what makes one recursive, how is it that we can reverse an array "without using iteration"?

There are two ways to reverse an array. Both methods require you to know the length of the array in advance. The iteration algorithm is favoured for its efficiency and its pseudo-code looks as follows:

function reverse(array)

    for each index i = 0 to (length(array) / 2 - 1)
        swap array[i] with array[length(array) - i]
    next

end

This is a purely iterative algorithm. Let us examine why we can come to this conclusion by comparing it to the Divide and Conquer paradigm which determines an algorithm's recursiveness.

  1. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is smaller than, but can be solved in a similar manner to, the original problem.

    YES: Reversal of the array is broken down to its finest granularity, elements, and processing for each element is identical to all other processed elements.

  2. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is independent and can be solved either recursively, or in a straightforward manner if small enough.

    YES: Reversal of element i in the array is possible without requiring that element (i + 1) (for example) has been reversed or not. Furthermore, reversal of element i in the array does not require the results of other element reversals in order to be able to complete.

  3. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where the results of those sub-problems are combined to give the solution for the original problem.

    NO: Being an iterative algorithm, only one calculation stage is performed at every algorithm step. It does not divide problems into subproblems and there is no merge of the results of two or more sub-problems to get a result.

The above analsys of our first algorithm above confirmed that it does not fit the Divide and Conquer paradigm, and therefore cannot be considered to be a recursive algorithm. However, as both criteria (1) and criteria (2) were satisifed, it is apparent that a recursive algorithm could be possible.

The key lies in the fact that the sub-problems in our iterative solution are of the smallest possible granularity (i.e. elements). By dividing the problem into successively smaller and smaller sub-problems (instead of going for the finest granularity from the start), and then merging the results of the sub-problems, the algorithm can be made recursive.

For example, if we have an array of 16 elements containing the first 16 letters of the Latin Alphabet (A..P), a recursive algorithm would visually look as follows:

                   Original Input

1.                ABCDEFHGIJKLMNOP                   Divide
2.        ABCDEFGH                IJKLMNOP           Divide
3.    ABCD        EFGH        IJKL        MNOP       Divide
4.  AB    CD    EF    GH    IJ    KL    MN    OP     Divide

5. A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P    Terminate

6.  BA    DC    FE    HG    JI    LK    NM    PO     Conquer (Reverse) and Merge
7.    DCBA        HGFE        LKJI        PONM       Conquer (Reverse) and Merge
8.        HGFEDCBA                PONMLKJI           Conquer (Reverse) and Merge
9.                PONMLKJIHGFEDCBA                   Conquer (Reverse) and Merge

                  Reversed Output

From top level, the 16 elements are progressively broken into smaller sub-problem sizes of exactly equal size (levels 1 to 4) until we reach the finest granularity of sub-problem; unit-length arrays in forward order (step 5, individual elements). At this point, our 16 array elements still appear to be in order. However, they are at the same time also reversed as a single element array is also a reversed array in its own right. The results of the single-element arrays are then merged to get eight reversed arrays of length two (step 6), then merged again to get four reversed arrays of length four (step 7), and so on until our original array has been reconstructed in reverse (steps 6 to 9).

The pseudo-code for the recursive algorithm to reverse an array looks as follows:

function reverse(array)

    /* check terminating condition. all single elements are also reversed
     * arrays of unit length.
     */
    if (length(array) < 2) then
        return array

    /* divide problem in two equal sub-problems. we process the sub-problems
     * in reverse order so that when combined the array has been reversed.
     */
    return reverse(array[(n/2) .. (n-1)]) + reverse(array[0 .. ((n/2)-1)])

end

As you can see, the algorithm breaks the problem into sub-problems until it reaches the finest granularity of sub-problem that gives an instant result. It then reverses the results while they are being merged to give a reversed result array. Although we think that this algorithm is recursive, let us apply the three critera for Divide and Conquer algorithms to confirm.

  1. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is smaller than, but can be solved in a similar manner to, the original problem.

    YES: Reversing the array at level one can be done using exactly the same algorithm as at level 2, 3, 4, or five.

  2. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where each sub-problem is independent and can be solved either recursively, or in a straightforward manner if small enough.

    YES: Every sub-problem that is not unit length is solved by splitting the problem into two independent sub-arrays and recursively reversing those sub-arrays. Unit length arrays, the smallest arrays possible, are themselves reversed so providing a terminating condition and a guaranteed first set of combine results.

  3. The problem is divided into [two or more] sub-problems where the results of those sub-problems are combined to give the solution for the original problem.

    YES: Every problem at levels 6, 7, 8, and 9 are composed only of results from the level immediately above; i.e. of their sub-problems. Reversal of the array at each level results in a reversed result overall.

As can be seen, our recursive algorithm passed the three criteria for the Divide and Conquer paradigm and so can be considered a truly recursive algorithm. Therefore, it is possible to reverse an array without using an iterative algorithm.

It is interesting to note that our original iterative algorithm for array reversal can be implemented using a recursive function. The pseudo code for such an implementation is as follows:

function reverse(array)

    if length(array) < 2
        return
    end

    swap array[0] and array[n-1]
    reverse(array[1..(n-1)])

end

This is similar to solutions proposed by other posters. This is a recursive implementation as the defined function eventually calls itself to repeatedly perform the same task over all the elements in the array. However, this does not make the algorithm recursive, as there is no division of the problems into sub-problems, and there is no merging of the results of sub-problems to give the final result. In this case, the recursion is simply being used as a flow-control construct, and algorithmically the overall result can be proved to be performing the same sequence of steps, in exactly the same order, as the original iterative algorithm that was proposed for the solution.

That is the difference between an Iterative Algorithm, a Recursive Algorithm, and a Recursive Implementation.

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5  
Did you actually type this?! –  Shahbaz Jul 6 '12 at 13:14
3  
The initial solution I knew instantly; it's a textbook use of recursion. The background of it took a few days to write. Most importantly, the Original Poster has potentially been misinformed and accepted the wrong answer. That's what I wanted to fix. –  aps2012 Jul 7 '12 at 0:36
1  
@ulterior Indeed, you're right. Corrected. –  aps2012 Jul 7 '12 at 1:21
1  
-1 despite the nice recursive algorithm because your distinction between recursive "algorithms" and "implementations" is entirely imaginary. An iterative algorithm is simply a recursive algorithm in which one of the subproblems is always a base case: iterative algorithms \subset recursive algorithms. Let me clear up your confusion about insertion sort: We have IS(x:rest) = merge(IS(x), IS(rest)), with IS(x) = x. The merging of the element x into the rest of the list is no different from the merging that mergesort does after splitting the problem in two! –  j_random_hacker Oct 10 '12 at 8:02
1  
@RayToal: Thanks, I appreciate your efforts to be diplomatic, and I agree that there's room for debate over exactly what recursion means (e.g. is it still "recursion" if a tail-recursive function is compiled down to an iterative loop?), but I have to insist that aps2012's taxonomy is objectively wrong (s/he forgot about combining solved subproblems) and confusing. With the number of upvotes s/he has (I presume based on length of the post and the mentioning of Cormen et al.), it's misleading many people! –  j_random_hacker Oct 10 '12 at 17:06

As people have said in the comments, it depends on the definition of iteration.

Case 1. Iteration as a programming style, different from recursion

If one takes recursion (simply) as an alternative to iteration, then the recursive solution presented by Kalai is the right answer.

Case 2. Iteration as lower bound linear time

If one takes iteration as "examining each element," then the question becomes one of whether array reversal requires linear time or can be done in sublinear time.

To show there is no sublinear algorithm for array reversal, consider an array with n elements. Assume an algorithm A exists for reversal which does not need to read each element. Then there exists an element a[i] for some i in 0..n-1 that the algorithm never reads, yet is still able to correctly reverse the array. (EDIT: We must exclude the middle element of an odd-length array -- see the comments below from this range -- see the comments below -- but this does not impact whether the algorithm is linear or sublinear in the asymptotic case.)

Since the algorithm never reads element a[i] we can change its value. Say we do this. Then the algorithm, having never read this value at all, will produce the same answer for reversal as it did before we changed its value. But this answer will not be correct for the new value of a[i]. Hence a correct reversal algorithm which does not at least read every input array element (save one) does not exist. Hence array reversal has a lower bound of O(n) and thus requires iteration (according to the working definition for this scenario).

(Note that this proof is only for array reversal and does not extend to algorithms that truly have sublinear implementations, like binary search and element lookup.)

Case 3. Iteration as a looping construct

If iteration is taken as "looping until a condition is met" then this translates into machine code with conditional jumps, known to require some serious compiler optimization (taking advantage of branch prediction, etc.) In this case, someone asking if there is a way to do something "without iteration" may have in mind loop unrolling (to straight line code). In this case you can in principle write straight-line (loop-free) C code. But this technique is not general; it only works if you know the size of the array beforehand. (Sorry to add this more-or-less flippant case to the answer, but I did so for completeness and because I have heard the term "iteration" used in this way, and loop unrolling is an important compiler optimization.)

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" But this answer will not be correct for the new value of a[i]. " wrong. this is not reverse sorting. reversal is independent of stored values. In any array of odd length you don't need to read the middle element at all. –  Will Ness Sep 27 '12 at 16:55
    
@WillNess: The element at the middle of an odd-length array is the only element you can safely avoid reading. IOW you can skip reading only O(1) of O(n) elements. Ray's proof would be better if it addressed this corner case (and if it said "But we can always choose a value for a[i] such that this answer will not be correct for the new value of a[i]") but his reasoning, and the O(n) lower bound, is fundamentally sound. –  j_random_hacker Oct 10 '12 at 8:30
    
@j_random_hacker I don't follow. reversal is independent of the stored values. Imagine stored values are complex structs and array cells hold pointers to these values; then reversal doesn't have to read any value even once, it only swaps pointers stored in cells. And in fact the Q relates to the array's implementation. You can implement an array such that reversing takes O(1) time, easily. Just put an addressing adapter on top of it. –  Will Ness Oct 10 '12 at 10:08
    
@WillNess: Even if the array elements are complex structs, O(n) - 1 = O(n) pointers will need to be swapped => O(n) work. Building a reversing adaptor is often a good idea, since it will allow O(1) lookups, but that's going outside the problem definition -- likewise, you can create a rotated view of an array with an adaptor that uses an offset, but that's not the same thing as rotating its elements :) –  j_random_hacker Oct 10 '12 at 10:51
    
@WillNess: To be as clear as possible: for this question, a function A[i] is specified a priori that returns the value at position i in array A; we are asked to rearrange A so that it winds up reversed with respect to this function. For the purposes of this question, we aren't allowed to construct a new function A'[i] such that the array is reversed w.r.t. it. –  j_random_hacker Oct 10 '12 at 10:56

Use recursive function.

void reverse(int a[],int start,int end)
{
     int temp;
     temp = a[start];
     a[start] = a[end];
     a[end] = temp;


    if(start==end ||start==end-1)
       return;
    reverse(a, start+1, end-1);
}

Just call the above method as reverse(array,0,lengthofarray-1)

share|improve this answer
3  
Recursion is disguised iteration. In the end, CPU accesses memory iteratively anyway. Only with useless overhead. –  Ondra Žižka Jul 4 '12 at 4:48
1  
@aps2012, this is a recursive algorithm: it is essentially the same as rev(a) = (a[n]) + rev(a[2..n-1]) + (a[1]) (with the appropriate stopping conditions). –  dbaupp Jul 7 '12 at 5:32
3  
@aps2012, arguing over definitions is pointless (and this is what this is), but, common usage suggests that this answer is recursion: except for your answer, all the definitions of recursion, including recursive algorithms I have seen are not just restricted to divide-and-conquer. –  dbaupp Jul 8 '12 at 3:31
2  
(Furthermore, your passive-aggressive statement "share your wisdom, in detail as I have" is unnecessary, please refrain from doing that in future; something like "If you could explain yourself more I would appreciate it" would be much better.) –  dbaupp Jul 8 '12 at 3:33
2  
@aps2012, I did backup my view: this answer satisfies the conventional definition of "recursive algorithm". Did you not read the 4 links I provided? (Anyway, I hate arguing from authority but: I've been around here longer than you (and have more "reputation" and a higher average reputation per answer), so I probably understand the dynamics of SO a little better. :) ) –  dbaupp Jul 9 '12 at 6:37

Implement a recursive function to reverse a sorted array. Ie, given the array [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5] your procedure should return [5, 4, 3, 2, 1].

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2  
No reason to add an answer to an already answered question. This doesn't add any value here and you won't get any upvotes either unless yours is different than the answers already stated. Try your hand at questions without any accepted answer. –  Aseem Bansal Jul 29 '13 at 15:16

Here's a neat solution using recursion in a javascript function. It does not require any parameters other than the array itself.

/* Use recursion to reverse an array */
function reverse(a){
    if(a.length==undefined || a.length<2){
        return a;
    }
    b=[];
    b.push(reverse(copyChop(a)));
    b.push(a[0]);
    return b;
    /* Return a copy of an array minus the first element */
    function copyChop(a){ 
        b=a.slice(1); 
        return b;
    }
}

Call it as follows;

reverse([1,2,3,4]);

Note that if you don't use the nested function copyChop to do the array slicing you end up with an array as the first element in your final result. Not quite sure why this should be so

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This question is tagged as C so why are giving a Javascript solution? –  Aseem Bansal Jul 29 '13 at 15:17
    
Didnt see that tag –  Phil C Jun 16 at 10:38
   #include<stdio.h>


   void rev(int *a,int i,int n)
  {

if(i<n/2)
{
    int temp = a[i];
    a[i]=a[n-i-1];
    a[n-i-1]=temp;
    rev(a,++i,n);
 }
}
int main()
    {
    int array[] = {3,2,4,5,6,7,8};
   int len = (sizeof(array)/sizeof(int));
   rev(array,0,len);    
   for(int i=0;i<len;i++)
   {
    printf("\n array[%d]->%d",i,array[i]);
  }
}
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