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Like Interfaces, can an abstract class have only method signature without implementation? If yes:

  1. How it differs from Interface?
  2. How another class, for which this Abstract Class is acting as a base class, can implement the body of that method?
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Corrected the title. –  RKh Jul 4 '12 at 6:40
    
I have a confusion on whether implementation is optional or compulsory. –  RKh Jul 4 '12 at 6:49
3  
Do you mean Can an abstract class have "only method signature" as interfaces without implementation? or Can an abstract class "have only method signature" as interfaces without implementation?? I decided to delete my answer because of the confusing title. –  Alvin Wong Jul 4 '12 at 6:49
1  
@AlvinWong: That is what he means, and it is really confusing things due to the way it is worded at the moment.. –  Ed S. Jul 4 '12 at 6:52
    
You guys have confused me further. I believe I meant the latter one. –  RKh Jul 4 '12 at 7:04
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8 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An abstract class can contain implementations, but it doesn't have to. This is one thing that makes it different from interfaces.

abstract class classA
{
    abstract public void MethodA();

    public void MethodB()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("This is MethodB inside ClassA");
    }
}

class classB : classA
{

    public override void MethodA()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("This is MethodA inside class B");
    }
}

If you implement a method in the abstract base class and want to be able to override it later, you need to declare the method as virtual.

virtual protected void MethodC(){
  //this can be overridden
}
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in Java:

q1: The abstract class can contain method definitions AND normal methods while an interface cannot.

q2: from http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/abstract.html

//this is the abstract class
public abstract class GraphicObject {
  abstract void draw();
}

//this is the implementation 
class Rectangle extends GraphicObject {
  void draw() {
    ...
  }
}
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Like Interfaces, can an abstract class have only method signature without implementation? If yes:

Yes, but can also have implementation ...

You can also have method implementation in the abstract class unlike interfaces, but you can not create an instance of an abstract class

Interfaces and Abstract Classes

Abstract Class versus Interface

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"Can Have" or "Must Have"? –  RKh Jul 4 '12 at 6:41
    
Can have.. ....... –  Asif Mushtaq Jul 4 '12 at 6:42
1  
The only correct answer here. –  Ed S. Jul 4 '12 at 6:42
1  
Wrong answer..An abstract class can have only method signature without implementation.. –  steelshark Jul 4 '12 at 6:43
    
@Asif If "Can Have" than how you answered "No". This means an abstract class must have implementation. –  RKh Jul 4 '12 at 6:47
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Like Interfaces, can an abstract class have only method signature without implementation?

Yes. Abstract class can have method implementation.

How it differs from Interface?

Variables declared in an interface is by default final. An abstract class may contain non-final variables.

Members of a interface are public by default. An abstract class can have the usual flavors of class members like private, protected, etc..

Interface is absolutely abstract and cannot be instantiated; An abstract class also cannot be instantiated, but can be invoked if a main() exists.

In comparison with abstract classes, interfaces are slow as it requires extra indirection.

Refer the following links:

http://forums.asp.net/t/1240708.aspx/1

http://java.sys-con.com/node/36250

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/11155/Abstract-Class-versus-Interface

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Don't use so much bold please. And use the blockquote markup instead of the code one when you're highlighting quotes. –  Fabrício Matté Jul 4 '12 at 6:49
    
Can't you have an abstract class without implementation? –  Kirk Broadhurst Jul 4 '12 at 7:01
1  
@KirkBroadhurst Yes. We can have an abstract class without implementation. –  Kalai Jul 4 '12 at 7:03
    
@Kirk Broadhurst yes you can have an abstract class without implementation –  MaVRoSCy Jul 4 '12 at 7:03
    
@MaVRoSCy This answer says no we can't. –  Kirk Broadhurst Jul 4 '12 at 7:06
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  1. Interface is a fully abstract class,
    Means only signatures, no implementations, no data members.
    On the other hand abstract class by defenition needs at least one abstract method.
    Also it can have implementations. And it also can contain data members which will be inherited to its inheritors.
  2. The inheritor needs to implement the abstract method with the same signature in order to implement it
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in JAVA Yes,

  1. if you use abstract class this way, then there is no difference between interface and abstract class. what dose abstract class really matter is you can offer common implementation which expect to be inherited by sub class, that's interface is not able to do.

  2. yes, as I said, that abstract class behave the same way as interface, you can just override the methods in sub class

For example:

public abstract class AbstractClassWithoutImplementation {

public abstract String methodA();

}

public class Implementation extends AbstractClassWithoutImplementation {

@Override
public String methodA() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return "Yes";
}

public static void main(String[] args){
    Implementation im = new Implementation();
    System.out.println(im.methodA());
}

}

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An abstract class is a class that cannot be instantiated. It is in between a concrete class (fully implemented) and an interface (not at all implemented).

It can contain regular members (variables, methods etc) that are fully implemented.

It can also contain abstract members that are not implemented. Any member that is not implemented, say a method signature, must be marked abstract.

So to answer your questions:

Like Interfaces, can an abstract class have only method signature without implementation?

Your wording is not clear enough to give a yes or no answer. An abstract class can have implemented methods, and it can have abstract methods that are not implemented which must be marked as abstract. It cannot have methods without implementation unless they are marked abstract.

If yes: How it differs from Interface?

Because it allows implementation of members.

How another class, for which this Abstract Class is acting as a base class, can implement the body of that method?

Simply needs to implement all the abstract members.

public abstract class A
{ 
    public abstract void Test();
}

public class B : A
{
    public void Test(){ return; }
}
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Like Interfaces, can an abstract class have only method signature without implementation? If yes:

Yes, An abstract class can have all abstract methods even if it has a single abstract method it must be abstract.You can declare a class as abstract even if it doesn't have any abstract method.

How it differs from Interface?

In Interface ALL methods are abstract public bet in Abstract class it is not necessary that .Please read about Interface vs Abstract Class

How another class, for which this Abstract Class is acting as a base class, can implement the body of that method?

If your BaseClass is Abstract and ChildClass is extending Base class you can implement abstract method in ChildClass otherwise make ChildClass abstract also.

public class ChildClass extends BaseClass{

void display(){

    /// Your Implementation here
}

}

abstract class BaseClass{

abstract void display();
}
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