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I have code that looks something like:

public static void func(Reader r){
    int c = r.read();
    ...
}

and the compiler tells me that r.read() might throw an IOException. Under what circumstances might this happen? It seems clear that something like FileNotFoundException is thrown when a file is not found, but an IOException is rather vague.

Edit:

In case it is of interest to anyone, I asked this question because I thought there must be a better way of handling the situation than just printStackTrace. However, without knowing what might cause the exception, I wasn't really sure how it should be done.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lots of things can cause an IOException. When it gets thrown, you can print it out or check the message (Exception.getMessage()) to see what caused it.

A FileNotFoundException is a subclass of IOException, you can check the "known subclasses" list for others.

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What specific situations might cause that to happen? It's just I've been using the function for a while, and I've never really seen an IOException being thrown before. –  math4tots Jul 4 '12 at 6:47
1  
If the reader's underlying stream is encoded and it reads a bad chunk and pukes, if the underlying stream is a socket stream and the network dies while you're reading, if you're attempting to read from a stream that's been closed, etc. There's literally an endless number of specific instances but it will depend mostly on your specific use of Reader.read() and your context. In the exception handling model, it's a generic "something with the stream is wrong" type of exception, and obviously read() is a place where something can go wrong with the stream. –  Jon Lin Jul 4 '12 at 6:50
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For example:

public void load(InputStream inputStream) throws IOException {
    this.inputStream = inputStream;
    this.properties.load(this.inputStream);
    this.keys = this.properties.propertyNames();
    inputStream.close();
}

I think that's when you have problem with input / output (connections) because of security or for example not opening the stream.

Code source: stackoverflow

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It can throw an IOException when the either the stream itself is corrupted or some error occurred during reading the data i.e. Security Exceptions, Permission Denied etc and/or a set of Exceptions which are derived from IOEXception.

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IOException is superclass of many exceptions like CharConversionException, CharacterCodingException and EOFException.

If the method listed all these exceptions then caller would have to catch all of them. So for convenience having IOException in throws clause helps callers to avoid multiple catch blocks. User can still handle specific exception if they desire so by checking for instance of or exception.getMessage().

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you can get the name of the sub-class by using System.out.println(exeption.getClass()); –  niccomatik Jul 4 '12 at 6:50
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If you want to know the specifics, in your catch block do this:

catch (IOException e)
{
    e.printStackTrace();
}
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This code will help you to debug and to see the IOException thrown:

String NL = System.getProperty("line.separator");
String line;
FileInputStream in;
try {
      fileName = choose.getSelectedFile().getCanonicalPath();
} catch (IOException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();  //This doesn't matter, see the second IOException catch.
}

try {
in = new FileInputStream(choose.getSelectedFile());
BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in, "UTF-8"));
StringBuffer content=new StringBuffer("");

while((line = reader.readLine()) != null){
    content.append(line+NL);
}

    textArea.setText(content.toString());
    reader.close();
    reader.readLine();

} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(new JFrame(), "The file does not exist!", "Error", JOptionPane.WARNING_MESSAGE);
} catch (IOException e) {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(new JFrame(), "There was an error in reading the file.", "Error", JOptionPane.WARNING_MESSAGE);
}

Good luck.

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