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I have the following nginx configuration fragment:

server {
   listen 80;

   server_name mydomain.io;

   root /srv/www/domains/mydomain.io;

   index index.html index.php;

   access_log /var/log/nginx/domains/mydomain.io/access.log;
   error_log /var/log/nginx/domains/mydomain.io/error.log;

   location ~\.php {
      try_files $uri =404;
      fastcgi_index index.php;
      fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root$fastcgi_script_name;
      fastcgi_intercept_errors on;
      fastcgi_pass 127.0.0.1:9000;
      include /etc/nginx/fastcgi_params;
   }
}

First, how can I make the server block respond to both http://www.mydomain.io and also http://mydomain.io. Second, I want to force if they come from http://www.mydomain.io to redirect to http://mydomain.io.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote -8 down vote accepted

On the first question - simply add both domains:

server_name mydomain.io www.mydomain.io;

For the second, you'll need this simple redirect:

server {
      listen 80;

      server_name www.mydomain.io mydomain.io;

      if ($host = 'www.mydomain.io' ) {
         rewrite  ^/(.*)$  http://mydomain.io/$1  permanent;
      }
share|improve this answer
5  
Using an if in nginx configs is strongly not recommended: wiki.nginx.org/IfIsEvil . Rather use two server blocks as suggested by @Gerry – Jrgns Feb 4 '13 at 3:09
2  
@Jrgns: Also,rewrite is mentioned as one of the two "100% safe things which may be done inside if in location context" in the nginx wiki... – Tisho Feb 4 '13 at 12:55
2  
If this gets enough down-votes that its value is negative will the system still retain it as the selected answer? – Bryson Jan 26 '14 at 2:18
    
This (or similar) solution is acceptable in some cases. For example, if you have regex or wildcard server_name, such as server_name ~^.*\.mydomain\.(com|net|org)$ you probably don't want to have code duplication with other server blocks, so you may use something like if ($host ~ "^www\.(.*)$") { #do redirect }. BTW, this if is not in location context ;) – Curious Nov 13 '15 at 14:20

According to http://wiki.nginx.org/Pitfalls, you should use:

server {
  server_name www.domain.com;
  return 301 $scheme://domain.com$request_uri;
}
server {
  server_name domain.com;
  [...]
}
share|improve this answer
14  
Please upvote this, people. It makes me sad to see the least suitable answer accepted, the second best with a majority of the votes... meanwhile the correct answer languishes. Gerry's answer is better than Tisho's, however Ryan's answer here is the recommended way to it. Think about it. Do you want the server answering two requests for every request it gets to www? No, no you don't. – Charlesism Oct 8 '13 at 6:14
1  
Totally agree!! – Bazinga777 Aug 3 '15 at 14:52

I believe it's better to add two seperate server blocks to avoid unnecessary checking by the if block. I also use the $scheme variable so that HTTPS requests will not be redirected to their insecure counterparts.

server {
    listen 80;

    server_name www.mydomain.io;

    rewrite ^ $scheme://mydomain.io$uri permanent;
}

server {
    listen 80;

    server_name mydomain.io;

    # your normal server block definitions here
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I up-voted this by mistake, but it is also an incorrect answer. The use of rewrite in this way is highly discouraged by the NGINX documentation itself. Please see Ryan's answer about the proper use of return 301 $scheme://domain.com$request_uri; – Bryson Jan 27 '14 at 13:33

Another way to code it :

if ($http_host ~* "^www\.(.+)$"){
    rewrite ^(.*)$ http://%1$request_uri redirect;
}

It works even with multiple domain names on the same code.

share|improve this answer
server {
    listen 80;
    server_name www.mydomain.io;
    return 301 https://$host$request_uri;
}

server {
    listen 80;
    server_name mydomain.io;
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

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