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I have a method which returns boolean type :

boolean activate() {
  try {

  } catch(IOException e){

  } catch (FileNotFoundException e){

  }
}

I want to know whether I need to return false or true, if there is an exception.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Ingo Kegel, hypercrypt, cdeszaq, Nathaniel Ford, Andrew Dec 24 '13 at 19:04

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Can you not put :

   boolean activate() {
      try {
          // Do Something risky...
          return true;

      } catch(IOException e){
        return false;
      }
      catch (FileNotFoundException e){
        return false;
      }

   }
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this is best way of doing or throwing an exception will be good? –  batman Jul 4 '12 at 8:16
    
Depends I would say on your requirements. –  Daniel Casserly Jul 4 '12 at 10:49

Only you know what activate should return on a failure.

If you don't know I suggest throwing the exception out of the method and have the caller deal with instead.

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You should make sure you consume the error in some way in production code, but the basic version is:

boolean activate() {
    try {

    } catch(Exception e){
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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This is a question of design (and thus likely to be closed), but it does demonstrate a very important point: contracts. What is the contract of your function?

/** This function will activate <a thing> and report success or failure to do so.
 *  @return true if <thing> is activated, false otherwise.
 */  //THIS CONTRACT IS SUPER IMPORTANT WHEN THINKING ABOUT CODING
boolean activate() {
  try {
    //Some code
    return true;
  } catch(IOException e){
    Log.error("When attempting to activate <thing> an IOException was thrown.");
    return false;//It wasn't activated! There was an IO exception, therefore follow the contract.
  } catch (FileNotFoundException e){
    Log.error("When attempting to activate <thing> a FileNotFoundException was thrown.");
    return false;//It wasn't activated! There was a different exception, therefore follow the contract.
  }
}

You'll note, though, the presence of logging. Why is this important? Because your code should be loud but durable. In this case; it's returning a contractually correct response (true/false), so any code calling it knows whether it succeeded and can behave appropriately without awkward exception handling or the entire program gracelessly crashing. This means it's durable code. But, the logging allows it to be loud: it means that, if you're monitoring the health of your app, you will readily see that there is a problem, and precisely where that problem is. And then you can fix it.

Contracts. Durability. Visibility.

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