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For loop should iterate through std::vector and populate content.

First for loop gives me an error message saying:

NO BINARY OPERATOR FOUND << No convert possible

vector<MyClass>classVector;
    for (vector<MyClass>::iterator i = classVector.begin();
                           i != classVector.end();
                           ++i)
            {
                cout << *i << endl;
            }

MyClass.h:

class MyClass{

private:

    string newTodayTaskString;

public:
    MyClass(string t) : newTodayTaskString (t){}

    ~MyClass(){}
};

This for loop iterates through a vector of strings and works perfectly. Why?

vector<string>stringVector;
   for (vector<string>::iterator i = stringVector.begin(); 
                         i != stringVector.end(); 
                         ++i) 
            {
                cout<<*i<<endl;
            }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to overload the stream operator for your class if you want to be able to directly call std::cout::operator <<.

You can either define it as:

 std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& stream, const MyClass& obj)
 {
    stream << obj.newTodayTaskString;
 }

and declare this operator as friend so it has access to the private members of the class or provide a print function to your class and use that instead.

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The question is unrelated to iteration, it's just because you can write

std::string s = "Hello";
std::cout << s;

but not

MyClass o("Hello");
std::cout << o;      

See How to properly overload the << operator for an ostream? on how to overload operator << to make it work!

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I think you want to print a member of the class, not the class itself.

For example:

cout << (*i).Name << endl; 
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Correct, sorry for confusion. –  McClane Jul 4 '12 at 9:15
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You should overload output operator.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

class MyClass{

private:
    std::string newTodayTaskString;

public:
    explicit MyClass(const std::string t) : newTodayTaskString (t){}
    std::ostream& print(std::ostream& os) const { return os << newTodayTaskString; }

    ~MyClass(){}
};

std::ostream& operator << (std::ostream& os, const MyClass& obj)
{
    return obj.print(os);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<MyClass> vec = {MyClass("add"), MyClass("clear")};
    std::copy(vec.begin(), vec.end(), std::ostream_iterator<MyClass>(std::cout, "\n"));
}
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Thank you too for the solution. –  McClane Jul 4 '12 at 9:17
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