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I have a mutable array that contains NSDictionary dic1 objects,

each dictionary has a key called contactId, more than one dictionary can have the same value for contactId.

What I want to do is to create an NSDictionary with unique contactIds as the keys and an array value that contains a list of all NSDictionary dic1 objects that have the value contactId equal to the key.

How can I do this?

My data looks like this:

**myArray**:[  **dic1** {contactId = x1 , name = name1 }, **dic2**{contactId = x2, name = 
name2 }, **dic3**{contactId = x1, name = name3} ]

I want it to become like this:

**NSDictionary**: { **x1**:[dic1, dic3], **x2**:[dic2] } 
share|improve this question
    
you can't have a dictionary with only value. It needs to have both, it's a type of data structure that is designed to looks like that and to behave accordingly. –  ant Jul 4 '12 at 9:04
    
@ant i believe you misunderstood my question –  ahmad Jul 4 '12 at 9:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use fast enumeration:

NSMutableDictionary *result = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];

for (id obj in myArray)
{
    NSString *contactId = [obj objectForKey:@"contactId"];
    NSMutableSet *contacts = [result objectForKey:contactId];
    if (!contacts)
    {
        contacts = [NSMutableSet set]
        [result setObject:contacts forKey:contactId];
    }
    [contacts addObject:obj];
}

You could use blocks for no real added benefit:

__block NSMutableDictionary *result = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];

[myArray enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id obj, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop){
    NSString *contactId = [obj objectForKey:@"contactId"];
    NSMutableSet *contacts = [result objectForKey:contactId];
    if (!contacts)
    {
        contacts = [NSMutableSet set]
        [result setObject:contacts forKey:contactId];
    }
    [contacts addObject:obj];
}];
share|improve this answer
    
neat coding ! thnx @dreamlax –  ahmad Jul 4 '12 at 9:52

How about the classic way?

NSMutableDictionary* Result;
NSEnumerator* Enumerator;
NSDictionary* Dict;
Result=[[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
Enumerator=[YourArray objectEnumerator];
while ((Dict=[Enumerator nextObject])!=nil)
{
   NSString* ContactID;
   NSMutableSet* Contacts;
   ContactID=[Dict objectForKey:@"contactID"];
   Contacts=[Result objectForKey:ContactID];
   if (Contacts==nil)
   {
      Contacts=[[NSMutableSet alloc] init];
      [Result setObject:Contacts forKey:ContactID];
      [Contacts release];
   }
   [Contacts addObject:Dict];
}

This should create a Result dictionary. I haven't tested (or even compiled) this, though.

share|improve this answer
3  
Please follow coding conventions, and name your variables using lowerCamelCase. –  dreamlax Jul 4 '12 at 9:11
    
Sorry, I didn't actually expect stackoverflow coding conventions, so I never looked for them... :-( –  Christian Stieber Jul 4 '12 at 9:33
    
@ChristianStieber -- They're standard C conventions, used by C coders everywhere (except in Microsoft, apparently). –  Hot Licks Jul 4 '12 at 11:54
    
@ChristianStieber: Have a look at Apple's example code. Objective-C code follows a very simple convention where variables and method names are in lowerCamelCase and classes are in UpperCamelCase. There are a few exceptions to the rule, but mostly this is the case. Using an UpperCamelCase variable name makes it difficult to distinguish whether the receiver is a class or an instance. –  dreamlax Jul 4 '12 at 19:28

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