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I have some urls that look like this:

http://subdomain_domain_com/some_path

http://subdomain_domain_com/?some_var=some_value

How do I write a regex to match the underscores only from the domain?

PS: I'm using the regex engine in ruby 1.8.7

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The second example is an invalid URI. It should include slash: http://subdomain_domain_com/?some_var=some_value –  Ofer Zelig Jul 4 '12 at 9:30
    
The validity of the urls is not an issue here, I just want to know how can I match the underscores from the domain. For this particular example I guess you could say I want to match any underscores contained between 2 forward-slashes –  adivasile Jul 4 '12 at 9:32
    
Right, but if you know that there is a slash for sure, it simplifies the Regex. –  Ofer Zelig Jul 4 '12 at 9:35
    
Can't you relate just to the first two matches? –  sjas Jul 4 '12 at 9:36
    
I don't always know for sure that there are only 2 underscores in there –  adivasile Jul 4 '12 at 9:39

2 Answers 2

Here's a regex (based on the exception I wrote in the comment about the URI):

(?<=https?://).*(?=/)

It covers both HTTP and HTTPS.

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The OP mentions something about matching underscores. –  Lev Levitsky Jul 4 '12 at 9:38
    
Yeah, I believe he meant matching the whole fragment of the domain name rather than the fragment(s) after. I don't believe he meant he just wanted underscore character matches. –  Ofer Zelig Jul 4 '12 at 9:43
    
Actually I want only the underscores matched –  adivasile Jul 4 '12 at 9:45
    
How? What do you want your output to be? Underscores? Groups of underscores? Give an example of an output you'd expect. –  Ofer Zelig Jul 4 '12 at 12:32

use this:

https?://(?<underscore>[^/]+)

and get group named underscore

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