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I am working on a logic that decreases the value of an alphanumeric List<char>. For example, A10 becomes A9, BBA becomes BAZ, 123 becomes 122. And yes, if the value entered is the last one(like A or 0), then I should return -

An additional overhead is that there is a List<char> variable which is maintained by the user. It has characters which are to be skipped. For example, if the list contains A in it, the value GHB should become GGZ and not GHA.

The base of this logic is a very simple usage of decreasing the char but with these conditions, I am finding it very difficult.

My project is in Silverlight, the language is C#. Following is my code that I have been trying to do in the 3 methods:

    List<char> lstGetDecrName(List<char> lstVal)//entry point of the value that returns decreased value
    {
        List<char> lstTmp = lstVal;
        subCheckEmpty(ref lstTmp);
        switch (lstTmp.Count)
        {
            case 0:
                lstTmp.Add('-');
                return lstTmp;
            case 1:
                if (lstTmp[0] == '-')
                {
                    return lstTmp;
                }
                break;
            case 2:
                if (lstTmp[1] == '0')
                {
                    if (lstTmp[0] == '1')
                    {
                        lstTmp.Clear();
                        lstTmp.Add('9');
                        return lstTmp;
                    }
                    if (lstTmp[0] == 'A')
                    {
                        lstTmp.Clear();
                        lstTmp.Add('-');
                        return lstTmp;
                    }
                }
                if (lstTmp[1] == 'A')
                {
                    if (lstTmp[0] == 'A')
                    {
                        lstTmp.Clear();
                        lstTmp.Add('Z');
                        return lstTmp;
                    }
                }
                break;
        }
        return lstGetDecrValue(lstTmp,lstVal);
    }



    List<char> lstGetDecrValue(List<char> lstTmp,List<char> lstVal)
    {
        List<char> lstValue = new List<char>();
        switch (lstTmp.Last())
        {
            case 'A':
                lstValue = lstGetDecrTemp('Z', lstTmp, lstVal);
                break;
            case 'a':
                lstValue = lstGetDecrTemp('z', lstTmp, lstVal);
                break;
            case '0':
                lstValue = lstGetDecrTemp('9', lstTmp, lstVal);
                break;
            default:
                char tmp = (char)(lstTmp.Last() - 1);
                lstTmp.RemoveAt(lstTmp.Count - 1);
                lstTmp.Add(tmp);
                lstValue = lstTmp;
                break;
        }
        return lstValue;
    }






    List<char> lstGetDecrTemp(char chrTemp, List<char> lstTmp, List<char> lstVal)//shifting places eg unit to ten,etc.
    {
        if (lstTmp.Count == 1)
        {
            lstTmp.Clear();
            lstTmp.Add('-');
            return lstTmp;
        }
        lstTmp.RemoveAt(lstTmp.Count - 1);
        lstVal = lstGetDecrName(lstTmp);
        lstVal.Insert(lstVal.Count, chrTemp);
        return lstVal;
    }

I seriously need help for this. Please help me out crack through this.

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1  
+1: very interesting problem. Have posted a working solution below. There is a bug in my exclusions code, mentioned, but that should be easy to fix. –  TrueBlueAussie Jul 4 '12 at 13:31
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5 Answers

The problem you are trying to solve is actually how to decrement discreet sections of a sequence of characters, each with it's own counting system, where each section is separated by a change between Alpha and Numeric. The rest of the problem is easy once you identify this.

The skipping of unwanted characters is simply a matter of repeating the decrement if you get an unwanted character in the result.

One difficultly is the ambiguous definition of the sequences. e.g. what to do when you get down to say A00, what is next? "A" or "-". For the sake of argument I am assuming a practical implementation based loosely on Excel cell names (i.e. each section operates independently of the others).

The code below does 95% of what you wanted, however there is a bug in the exclusions code. e.g. "ABB" becomes "AAY". I feel the exclusions need to be applied at a higher level (e.g. repeat decrement until no character is in the exclusions list), but I don't have time to finish it now. Also it is resulting in a blank string when it counts down to nothing, rather than the "-" you wanted, but that is trivial to add at the end of the process.

Part 1 (divide the problem into sections):

public static string DecreaseName( string name, string exclusions )
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(name))
    {
        return name;
    }

    // Split the problem into sections (reverse order)
    List<StringBuilder> sections = new List<StringBuilder>();
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder(name.Length);
    bool isNumeric = char.IsNumber(name[0]);
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sections.Add(sb);
    foreach (char c in name)
    {
        // If we change between alpha and number, start new string.
        if (char.IsNumber(c) != isNumeric)
        {
            isNumeric = char.IsNumber(c);
            sb = new StringBuilder();
            sections.Insert(0, sb);
        }
        sb.Append(c);
    }

    // Now process each section
    bool cascadeToNext = true;
    foreach (StringBuilder section in sections)
    {
        if (cascadeToNext)
        {
            result.Insert(0, DecrementString(section, exclusions, out cascadeToNext));
        }
        else
        {
            result.Insert(0, section);
        }
    }

    return result.ToString().Replace(" ", "");
}

Part2 (decrement a given string):

private static string DecrementString(StringBuilder section, string exclusions, out bool cascadeToNext)
{
    bool exclusionsExist = false;
    do
    {
        exclusionsExist = false;
        cascadeToNext = true;
        // Process characters in reverse
        for (int i = section.Length - 1; i >= 0 && cascadeToNext; i--)
        {
            char c = section[i];
            switch (c)
            {
                case 'A':
                    c = (i > 0) ? 'Z' : ' ';
                    cascadeToNext = (i > 0);
                    break;
                case 'a':
                    c = (i > 0) ? 'z' : ' ';
                    cascadeToNext = (i > 0);
                    break;
                case '0':
                    c = (i > 0) ? '9' : ' ';
                    cascadeToNext = (i > 0);
                    break;
                case ' ':
                    cascadeToNext = false;
                    break;
                default:
                    c = (char)(((int)c) - 1);
                    if (i == 0 && c == '0')
                    {
                        c = ' ';
                    }
                    cascadeToNext = false;
                    break;
            }
            section[i] = c;
            if (exclusions.Contains(c.ToString()))
            {
                exclusionsExist = true;
            }
        }
    } while (exclusionsExist);
    return section.ToString();
}

The dividing can of course be done more efficiently, just passing start and end indexes to the DecrementString, but this is easier to write & follow and not much slower in practical terms.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not a fan of your dictionary. It symantically misuses KeyValuePair, requires converting strings to chars, opens you up to typos ('Z' => "X", '0' => ""?), requires more LOC than a simple method to get the required char and bool (even in the snipped form you've given), and may even be less performant than such a method. –  Rawling Jul 4 '12 at 11:10
    
@Rawling: The code was in progress at the time, hence the typos. Have switched to a code only approach. –  TrueBlueAussie Jul 4 '12 at 13:23
    
good answr, nice approach to it –  user1425606 Jul 5 '12 at 5:39
    
@HiTechMagic, I sorted out my code with a few complexities and it is working fine now. But your code looks promising(not messy like mine, I have used 5 method calls now). So, I am trying to implement your mentioned code, and bug removals, like B1 should become B0 and not B. Lets see, if everything works fine, then I might replace my code or else be as it is :) –  vaibhav Jul 5 '12 at 8:43
    
@vaibhav: If I get a chance to fix it I will (I can use it on one of my own projects for filename incrementing). I have a winforms test app running it at the moment. –  TrueBlueAussie Jul 5 '12 at 8:53
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do a check if its a number if so then do a minus math of the number, if its a string then change it to char codes and then the char code minus 1

share|improve this answer
    
it is not that easy as it seems to be @Johnn, I too felt the same while starting to write logic for it. but the complications that are demanded are not that easy to figure out. –  vaibhav Jul 4 '12 at 9:47
    
I have made code like that to generate a list with all possible words, only mine increased in number instead of decreasing in nr –  JohnnBlade Jul 4 '12 at 9:50
    
thats the saddest part of the problem, sir... Increasing is not the problem, decreasing is. I already have perfectly working code for increased values, but my decreased code is very buggy –  vaibhav Jul 4 '12 at 9:55
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I couldn't stop thinking about this yesterday, so here's an idea. Note, this is just pseudo-code, and not tested, but I think the idea is valid and should work (with a few modifications).

The main point is to define your "alphabet" directly, and specify which characters in it are illegal and should be skipped, then use a list or array of positions in this alphabet to define the word you start with.

I can't spend any more time on this right now, but please let me know if you decide to use it and get it to work!

string[] alphabet = {a, b, c, d, e};
string[] illegal = {c, d};


public string ReduceString(string s){
            // Create a list of the alphabet-positions for each letter:
    int[] positionList = s.getCharsAsPosNrsInAlphabet();
    int[] reducedPositionList = ReduceChar(positionList, positionList.length);

    string result = "";
    foreach(int pos in reducedPositionList){
        result += alphabet[pos];
    }

    return result;
}


public string ReduceChar(string[] positionList, posToReduce){
    int reducedCharPosition = ReduceToNextLegalChar(positionList[posToReduce]);
    // put reduced char back in place:
    positionList[posToReduce] = reducedCharPosition; 

    if(reducedCharPosition < 0){
        if(posToReduce <= 0){
            // Reached the end, reduced everything, return empty array!:
            return new string[](); 
        }
        // move to back of alphabet again (ie, like the 9 in "11 - 2 = 09"):
        reducedCharPosition += alphabet.length;     
        // Recur and reduce next position (ie, like the 0 in "11 - 2 = 09"):
        return ReduceChar(positionList, posToReduce-1); 
    }

    return positionList;
}


public int ReduceToNextLegalChar(int pos){
    int nextPos = pos--;
    return (isLegalChar(nextPos) ? nextPos : ReduceToNextLegalChar(nextPos));
}


public boolean IsLegalChar(int pos){
        return (! illegal.contains(alphabet[pos]));
}
enter code here
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the effort you put in. Yes, exactly, the idea you are trying to convey in the psuedo-form is what the actual workflow it should follow. I have already implemented my code in the similar way. :) Its just that I need to make my code more stringent in terms of bug removal and I am already upto it. –  vaibhav Jul 5 '12 at 8:50
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Without writing all your code for you, here's a suggestion as to how you can break this down:

char DecrementAlphaNumericChar(char input, out bool hadToWrap)
{
    if (input == 'A')
    {
        hadToWrap = true;
        return 'Z';
    }
    else if (input == '0')
    {
        hadToWrap = true;
        return '9';
    }
    else if ((input > 'A' && input <= 'Z') || (input > '0' && input <= '9'))
    {
        hadToWrap = false;
        return (char)((int)input - 1);
    }
    throw new ArgumentException(
        "Characters must be digits or capital letters",
        "input");
}

char DecrementAvoidingProhibited(
    char input, List<char> prohibited, out bool hadToWrap)
{
    var potential = DecrementAlphaNumericChar(input, out hadToWrap);
    while (prohibited.Contains(potential))
    {
        bool temp;
        potential = DecrementAlphaNumericChar(potential, out temp);
        if (potential == input)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                "A whole class of characters was prohibited",
                "prohibited");
        }
        hadToWrap |= temp;
    }
    return potential;
}

string DecrementString(string input, List<char> prohibited)
{
    char[] chrs = input.ToCharArray();
    for (int i = chrs.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        bool wrapped;
        chrs[i] = DecrementAvoidingProhibited(
                      chrs[i], prohibited, out wrapped);
        if (!wrapped)
            return new string(chrs);
    }
    return "-";
}

The only issue here is that it will reduce e.g. A10 to A09 not A9. I actually prefer this myself, but it should be simple to write a final pass that removes the extra zeroes.

For a little more performance, replace the List<char>s with Hashset<char>s, they should allow a faster Contains lookup.

share|improve this answer
    
nice, suggestion, I will have to apply this and check out for a work around for the last pointer of yours –  vaibhav Jul 4 '12 at 10:01
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found solution to my own answer with some other workarounds.

The calling function:

    MyFunction()
    {
        //stuff I do before
        strValue = lstGetDecrName(strValue.ToList());//decrease value here
        if (strValue.Contains('-'))
        {
            strValue = "-";
        }
        //stuff I do after
    }

In all there are 4 functions. 2 Main functions and 2 helper functions.

    List<char> lstGetDecrName(List<char> lstVal)//entry point, returns decreased value
    {
        if (lstVal.Contains('-'))
        {
            return "-".ToList();
        }
        List<char> lstTmp = lstVal;
        subCheckEmpty(ref lstTmp);
        switch (lstTmp.Count)
        {
            case 0:
                lstTmp.Add('-');
                return lstTmp;
            case 1:
                if (lstTmp[0] == '-')
                {
                    return lstTmp;
                }
                break;
            case 2:
                if (lstTmp[1] == '0')
                {
                    if (lstTmp[0] == '1')
                    {
                        lstTmp.Clear();
                        lstTmp.Add('9');
                        return lstTmp;
                    }
                    if (lstTmp[0] == 'A')
                    {
                        lstTmp.Clear();
                        lstTmp.Add('-');
                        return lstTmp;
                    }
                }
                if (lstTmp[1] == 'A')
                {
                    if (lstTmp[0] == 'A')
                    {
                        lstTmp.Clear();
                        lstTmp.Add('Z');
                        return lstTmp;
                    }
                }
                break;
        }

        List<char> lstValue = new List<char>();
        switch (lstTmp.Last())
        {
            case 'A':
                lstValue = lstGetDecrTemp('Z', lstTmp, lstVal);
                break;
            case 'a':
                lstValue = lstGetDecrTemp('z', lstTmp, lstVal);
                break;
            case '0':
                lstValue = lstGetDecrTemp('9', lstTmp, lstVal);
                break;
            default:
                char tmp = (char)(lstTmp.Last() - 1);
                lstTmp.RemoveAt(lstTmp.Count - 1);
                lstTmp.Add(tmp);
                subCheckEmpty(ref lstTmp);
                lstValue = lstTmp;
                break;
        }
        lstGetDecrSkipValue(lstValue);
        return lstValue;

    }


    List<char> lstGetDecrSkipValue(List<char> lstValue)
    {
        bool blnSkip = false;
        foreach (char tmpChar in lstValue)
        {
            if (lstChars.Contains(tmpChar))
            {
                blnSkip = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (blnSkip)
        {
            lstValue = lstGetDecrName(lstValue);
        }
        return lstValue;
    }


    void subCheckEmpty(ref List<char> lstTmp)
    {
        bool blnFirst = true;
        int i = -1;
        foreach (char tmpChar in lstTmp)
        {
            if (char.IsDigit(tmpChar) && blnFirst)
            {
                i = tmpChar == '0' ? lstTmp.IndexOf(tmpChar) : -1;
                if (tmpChar == '0')
                {
                    i = lstTmp.IndexOf(tmpChar);
                }
                blnFirst = false;
            }
        }
        if (!blnFirst && i != -1)
        {
            lstTmp.RemoveAt(i);
            subCheckEmpty(ref lstTmp);
        }
    }


    List<char> lstGetDecrTemp(char chrTemp, List<char> lstTmp, List<char> lstVal)//shifting places eg unit to ten,etc.
    {
        if (lstTmp.Count == 1)
        {
            lstTmp.Clear();
            lstTmp.Add('-');
            return lstTmp;
        }
        lstTmp.RemoveAt(lstTmp.Count - 1);
        lstVal = lstGetDecrName(lstTmp);
        lstVal.Insert(lstVal.Count, chrTemp);
        subCheckEmpty(ref lstVal);
        return lstVal;
    }
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