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@interface A : NSObject

- (void) tmp;
- (void) foo;

@end

@implementation A

- (void) tmp {
    [self foo];
}

- (void) foo {
    NSLog(@"A");
}

@end

derived class

@interface B : A

- (void) foo;

@end

@implementation B

- (void) foo {
    NSLog(@"B");
}

@end

code

B * b = [[B alloc] init];
[b tmp]; // -> writes out B

is there a way to implement A, so a call to [self foo] inside [self tmp] in class A would result in calling A:foo not B:foo

(so the output after calling [b foo] == @"B" and after calling [b tmp] == @"A")

smth like

@implementation A

- (void) tmp {
    [ALWAYS_CALL_ON_A foo];
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use super

@implementation B

- (void) tmp {
     [super foo];
}
@end
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cant this be done without super? simmilar to Parag Bafna but only without using class methods? –  Peter Lapisu Jul 4 '12 at 10:07
    
what's wrong with using super? –  Michał Zygar Jul 4 '12 at 11:02
1  
If you just omit the definition of tmp in B you get the same effect. @PeterLapisu what you're asking about is a non-virtual method. Objective-C doesn't have those (but C++ does). –  echristopherson Jul 5 '12 at 18:27
    
Not realy, please notice that I call [super foo] not [super tmp]. If you omit this definition, you will get 'B' on the output. –  Michał Zygar Jul 6 '12 at 7:16

Use class methods

@interface A : NSObject {

}
- (void) tmp;
+ (void) foo;
@end

@implementation A
- (void) tmp {
    [A foo];
}

+ (void) foo {
    NSLog(@"A");
}
@end
#import "A.h"
@interface B : A {

}
+ (void) foo;
@end

@implementation B
+ (void) foo {
    NSLog(@"B");
}

@end
share|improve this answer
    
usecase - i cannot use a class method... can something like this be done with instance methods? –  Peter Lapisu Jul 4 '12 at 10:05

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