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I am trying to write a regex that will match the following YACC expression: [left | right] || [top | bottom]:

It should match: (left or right) AND OR (top or bottom). OR '|' is simple to do but '||' I can't figure it out. This expression is part of a CSS gradient grammar defined by W3C:

<linear-gradient> = linear-gradient(
    [ [ <angle> | to <side-or-corner> ] ,]? 
    <color-stop>[, <color-stop>]+
)

<side-or-corner> = [left | right] || [top | bottom]

Edit: Giving: left top Matched: left top

Giving: left Matched: left

Giving: right bottom Matched: right bottom

Giving: right 20px Matched: right

Hope this explains it better. Thank you

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see update please –  gion_13 Jul 4 '12 at 11:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If I understood correctly, you want either a side (left/right/top/bottom) or a corner (top-left,bottom-right...).
This can be solved as something like :

/^((left|right|top|bottom)|((top|bottom)delimiter(left|right)))$/

you can, of course, reverse the order of the sides for corner notation (to output corners as left-top and not top-left) :

/^((left|right|top|bottom)|((left|right)delimiter(top|bottom)))$/

Note that delimiter is your desired delimiter (can be an empty space or a minus sign).
Hope this helps!

P.S. : I heard your call for help on twitter :P.

update
based on your edit, I think now I understand what you need :

/^((left|right|top|bottom)|((left|right|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)))\s+(top|bottom|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)))))$/   

This regex now matches a side (left/top/right/bottom) or two sides defined by left & top values, which can be either the direction keywords (left/top/right/bottom) or an actual value (such as 100px or 1.4em).
The value regex (-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)) matches any floating number (even without the first zero : .123 instead of 0.123) followed by a unit of measurement (here you can supply a full list of units)

Here's some of my (javascript) test which passed:

var pattern = /^((left|right|top|bottom)|((left|right|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)))\s+(top|bottom|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)))))$/;
pattern.test('left bottom');   // true
pattern.test('-10px top');     // true
pattern.test('-.23em 140%');   // true

final update

  • removed the start & end characters
  • switched the order of the side and corner patterns, prioritizing the corner pattern to match first

/(((left|right|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)))\s+(top|bottom|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%))))|(left|right|top|bottom))/

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Thanks for the help :) It should actually just match left and top. Check out my edit. –  Mircea Jul 4 '12 at 10:58
    
regexr.com?31eib in this case it works. However if you replace bottom with something else (not a number) it does not. So "left bottom" matches "left bottom", this is right. "left somethingelse" should match just "left" –  Mircea Jul 4 '12 at 11:38
    
ok, well then just eliminate the ^ and $ characters : /((left|right|top|bottom)|((left|right|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)))\s+(top|bottom‌​|(-?\d*(\.\d+)?(px|em|\%)))))/ . this will allow you to have somethingelse before or after your desired matches and still pass the test. –  gion_13 Jul 4 '12 at 11:54
    
Sorry, now it doesn't match 'left bottom'. Just matches 'left' :) –  Mircea Jul 4 '12 at 12:01
    
update.. again :) –  gion_13 Jul 4 '12 at 12:07
/(left|right)|(top|bottom)|(left|right)\s(top|bottom)/

should do the task. You might shorten it to

/(left|right|top|bottom)|(left|right)\s(top|bottom)/

or

/(left|right)|((left|right)\s)?(top|bottom)/
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Looks like only the first 'left' is matched. It should be: left and top. Check it out: regexr.com?31ehs –  Mircea Jul 4 '12 at 10:51
    
OK, that would need a ^ and $... As in gion13s answer. –  Bergi Jul 4 '12 at 18:08

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